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Topic: AUA Talks

How I became Dean with Professor Veronica Hope Hailey

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📥  AUA Talks, Uncategorised

Veronica was asked by members of the University of Bath’s AUA to talk about her personal career path and how she came to be Dean of the School of Management and her role as Vice-President of corporate engagement.

From taking the wrong course, sampling various roles, saying no to a promotion and finding the time to have a family, Veronica reassured us that she had not set out a determined trajectory with an end goal of being a Dean.

Veronica described a feeling of slight disillusionment after leaving university, which she now attributes to having chosen a degree course which was not right for her.  Her subsequent aim to do something completely different led her to temporary roles of a varying nature and eventually to a commercial role with a firm of national commercial estate agents.  She realised through this that although the nature of the work was not quite right, she had developed a fascination for 'the workplace', the people within it and how it operated.

Her values steered her into the charitable sector where she first managed a team and was promoted to regional manager, so her career was on track.  When she fell pregnant she vowed to return to full-time work promptly.  As many new mothers find out, this plan took a change once the reality struck home.  Alongside motherhood, Veronica studied for a Masters and then a PhD which took her into academia and eventually to the University of Bath (twice!) and multiple children (five!).  She took the daring decision to turn down an opportunity for progression from the University of Cambridge as it would compromise her role as a mother.

Veronica describes how testing experiences in her personal life and family obligations allowed her to gain perspective and resilience.  She gave the AUA members some words of advice:

  • Expose yourself to excellence and make your own luck
  • Be prepared to take difficult decisions
  • Be aware of what is happening externally as well as internally
  • Make use of your support network
  • Be prepared to compromise (spending less on holidays)
  • Find someone who is confident in your skills who can be your spokesperson

Strong themes featured throughout including; appreciation of people/teams,  collaboration, honesty, integrity and trust.  These themes were emphasised in her responses to questions from the audience which drew our session to a close.

 

Engaging with the Bigger Picture – Professor David Galbreath

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📥  AUA Talks

Earlier this week, Bath AUA launched its 2017/18 Events Programme with a talk by Professor David Galbreath, Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

David spoke to us about the Faculty, his role as Dean, and his own research --in international security, military and strategic theory, emergent warfare, science and technology advances, and arms control.

The theme of this year’s AUA programme is ‘engaging with the bigger picture’, and David’s talk provided plenty of food for thought for AUA members. His overview of the Faculty structure was helpful (particularly for those of us outside the Faculty). He also encouraged us to think beyond formal structures, about the Faculty’s broader global aims. He summarised these as:

  • A fairer society;
  • A secure society;
  • A healthy society;
  • Enabling society.

These bigger picture aims have drawn many people towards a career in University administration, and it was pleasing to hear David talk about them inclusively as shared goals. David outlined how the Faculty was working collaboratively towards these aims through research, public engagement, and teaching --focussed not only on employability, but also citizenship.

The Faculty is well placed in The Guardian League Tables. It has become increasingly innovative in its teaching, and has some exciting future programmes planned. David highlighted the Faculty’s diversity as one of its key strengths.

David’s presentation also touched on key challenges, reflecting wider challenges within the sector including political uncertainties around student fees and Brexit. The Faculty needs to remain competitive and ambitious in this environment, particularly in its efforts to grow PGT numbers.

Achieving a healthy work/life balance has also become a significant challenge for many people. The demands of KPI requirements (such as REF, TEF and NSS), and the need to secure research funding, place additional stress on academic staff – and impinge upon their capacity for creative thinking and innovation. David spoke personally about the challenges he has experienced as a Dean with a young family and ongoing research interests. Finding the time to read, and the headspace to think, is critical.

Although the challenges of work/life balance are experienced individually, David’s talk made it clear that this is also a shared challenge. He talked about working with HR to manage mental health, and finding ways to ease pressure on staff -- to give them space to be creative in a creative industry.

David’s parting words emphasised the importance of recognising the people who make University processes work, and of working collaboratively across the University and its micro-cultures.

The talk was an excellent introduction to Bath AUA’s ‘Engaging with the Bigger Picture’ series. As an administrator working outside the Faculty, I walked away feeling both engaged and included in the Faculty’s aims for the future.

Jen Scheppers

AUA Member

 

 

AUA Talks University priorities: Workforce Strategy – Richard Brooks

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📥  AUA Talks

Author: Sarah Stead, Student Experience Officer - Faculty of Engineering and Design

A Workforce for the Future is how Richard Brooks summed up his fascinating talk about the current Workforce Strategy, agreed by Council at the end of 2016.

Richard started his talk on a slightly worrying note stating that when you google jokes about Workforce Strategy you get very few search results! But we didn’t need to worry – Richard kept the audience interested and engaged with information and insights that gave everyone food for thought.

Richard described the strategy as a bridge between the University led drivers for change to making things happen and explained the importance of developing strategic leaders, actively managing talent, developing performance, building resilience and ensuring the university has lean, responsive, self-service procedures moving forward.

Personally I will take away his comment about performance targets “What is the point of setting targets when you don’t know how you are going to meet them” I think we could all benefit from remembering that from time to time!

Richard Brooks (1)

Richard Brooks

Director of Human Resources - University of Bath

 

See one, do one, teach one… apparently the same rule applies to training!

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📥  AUA Talks

Author: Jenny Medland, Student Experience Officer & Suzanne Jacobs, Assistant Registrar - Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

See one, do one, teach one… apparently the same rule applies to training! Having attended useful externally delivered training sessions on how to have productive Difficult Conversations and Emotional Intelligence and Mindfulness in the Workplace our line manager suggested that we develop a joint presentation for other Faculty colleagues on what we had learned. There was such a natural overlap between the topics we agreed that this would be a good idea. This meant, amidst all the excitement of the run up to Christmas, we ended up sitting in front of a computer screen trying to work out the best way to consolidate two days of wide-ranging training into an hour session.

In our planning meeting, we started by sharing our key takeaways from our respective sessions. This was done in order to identify a shared message: the importance of being empathetic and ‘mindful’ both in discussion with others and in reflecting on our own behaviour. We didn’t want to overload attendees with information and ideas, so identifying this message helped keep the session focused and succinct. We were also keen to emphasise why the session and concepts discussed would be useful to attendees – they help in managing stress and improving working relationships and communication – to show the value of the techniques discussed. Finally, we wanted to make sure the training had lots of practical exercises to avoid it feeling like a dry lecture to our peers and to instead give an opportunity for discussion and the sharing of ideas and advice.

We began our talk by defining Emotional Intelligence (EQ) (an individual’s abilities of recognising, understanding and choosing how they think, feel and act) and Mindfulness (paying attention in a particular way; on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgementally), discussing how they are important in helping manage stress and improving relationships. We gave attendees a quiz to help them assess their own EQ to help contextualise these potentially abstract concepts, and provided a list of links and resources for those interested in finding out more.

For the second half of the talk, we used Mindfulness and EQ as tools to be applied in managing difficult conversations more productively, offering a practical application of what can be seen as an abstract concept. Using three key ‘types’ of Difficult Conversations, we spoke about how being self-reflective (identifying and developing your own stressors, strengths and weaknesses) and empathetic (sensitive and open to the other’s perspective) can help. We then ended by splitting the room into groups of three who roleplayed a scenario of a difficult conversation, where participants had to apply these skills.

We both found running this session really helpful in cementing our own understanding and processing of the training and ideas discussed. It was also interesting to be able to share ideas and perspectives with colleagues, both in the training session itself and in developing the session together beforehand. While there was a limit to the amount of detail or practice possible in such a short session, the feedback from the participants was really positive. A number of people indicated that they would endeavour to be more mindful and EQ aware in their subsequent conversations and working relationships. Many also indicated that they would be seeking further details after the meeting, following up on some of the additional sources of information provided.

 

AUA Talks University Priorities - Professor Bernie Morley, Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Provost

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📥  AUA Talks

Author: Rachel Acres, Assistant Registrar, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

Professor Morley began by outlining the breadth and diversity of his role as Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Provost, which included responsibility for education, research, staffing, and of course, that perennial issue - car parking. His main focus was on delivering the University Strategy, and challenging the Deans (who he line-managed) to ensure all Departments had their own strategies, including a clear plan for academic staff recruitment for the next five years.

Student number planning and target setting was a core part of Professor Morley’s job, ensuring that the number of offers and conversion to places was spot on, which always made the summer a nerve-racking time. Supporting teaching and research through ensuring appropriate infrastructure is the other main tenet of the role of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Provost.
Professor Morley reported that the University is facing a number of external pressures which mean that our previous working assumptions may not be true in the future.

Professor Morley highlighted the five key priorities for the University, as laid out in the University Strategy 2016-21:

• Growth of research – the University would prioritise areas of investment increasingly based on returns and the ability to support other areas, e.g. allowing us to continue to offer expensive subjects such as Chemistry. Four years of fixed student fee income with rising costs meant the Senior Management needs to focus on ensuring financial stability.

• Stabilise undergraduate numbers – there is increasing competition as other institutions are offering more places, and moreover the opportunity for placements (a previously unique selling point – USP – for Bath). Changes to GCSE and A Levels may necessitate revised entry requirements and could result in a dip in applications for those programmes requiring A Level Mathematics (which is supposed to be more difficult in its new form). A demographic dip in the number of young people means less people entering Higher Education, at least for the next few years – apparently, there is a boom in primary aged children but for example, the city of Bath has 600 unfilled sixth form spaces. Opportunities for involvement in Degree Apprenticeships would be explored. The University needs to ensure its programmes are as up to date and innovative as possible, supported by effective marketing (e.g. more Open Days, more mobile friendly platforms to showcase our programmes and maintain market advantage).

• Postgraduate Growth – compared to other research intensive institutions, the University had relatively small postgraduate taught student numbers. A number of new postgraduate taught programmes had been fast-tracked through University approval procedures to recruit students for 2017/18, and Professor Morley emphasised that the institution needed to view postgraduate provision differently. Masters programmes needed to attract higher numbers of students, delivering a package of skills and cross-disciplinary learning. Providing distance-learning programmes with partners (including internationally) was being considered. Professional Services would need to be involved in supporting this growth and ensuring the development of staff to meet the new challenges facing the institution.

• Infrastructure – Professor Morley highlighted recent successful developments such as 10 West, 4 East South, Manvers Street, and noted Polden Court would be developed to provide new postgraduate accommodation in the next year

• International focus – the University needed to affirm its international influence and become more visible.

In closing, Professor Morley highlighted that there were a number of external influences, including changes to secondary level education, the need to comply with consumer legislation and Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) guidance, the introduction of the Higher Education and Research Bill and the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), and the evolving Widening Participation agenda which would all impact on University business and were being closely monitored.

 

AUA Talks University priorities: The Centre for Learning and Teaching – Professor Andrew Heath (Academic Director)

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📥  AUA Talks

Author: Jenny Medland, Student Experience Office, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences

What attributes should a graduate leave the University of Bath with? How can we respond to the challenges Brexit or changes to A-levels pose to student recruitment, or to the opportunities of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF)? How can we integrate effective and efficient technologies for learning? These are the type of questions the new Centre for Learning and Teaching (CLT) will be looking at, and at this AUA event its Academic Director Professor Andrew Heath outlined its remit and initial plans.

The session began by establishing the CLT’s role in securing the future success of the University of Bath: a strong learning experience supports student satisfaction, student satisfaction aids recruitment of strong students, robust recruitment protects the University’s income and elite reputation. The changing nature of the HE landscape – with Brexit, TEF, and general economic uncertainty to name but a few challenges – makes it particularly important that Bath can respond proactively and capitalise on potential opportunities. The CLT will help equip Bath to meet these changes by ensuring the highest levels of learning and teaching across the institution.

More practically, to achieve its aims the CLT will provide proactive support for key learning and teaching activities such as TEF, and work more widely on the development and improvement of learning experience provide by Bath. There are four main areas within the centre:

- Academic Staff Development
- Technology Enhanced Learning
- Student Engagement
- Curriculum Development

In a fifty minute session Andrew could only provide a brief overview of his priorities for each area, but it gave a useful insight into plans. Academic Staff Development will be focusing on increasing the number of staff across the institution with formal teaching qualifications, an area of increasing importance as this will be publically available and will most likely be reported in league tables in the future. Technology Enhanced Learning will be delivering on a University-wide strategy ensuring that development activities and technological investment are effective and aligned with strategic priorities. Student Engagement will be identifying opportunities for students to actively contribute to the development of their programmes. And, last but not least, CLT will support Curriculum Development through working with departments to review and develop their programmes through TraCA (Transforming Curricula and Assessment), largely replacing the current degree scheme reviews. This latter work with focus particularly on aligning our curricula for both technical content and academic skills with the desired attributes for graduates on particular programmes, reducing overassessment of students and work to develop and implement more creative ways of teaching and assessing student progress.

The CLT will aim to work in close partnership with academic departments and other services, providing coordinated central support and guidance whilst still ensuring departments have ownership of their programmes, curriculum, and academic priorities. You can find out more through their website: http://www.bath.ac.uk/learningandteaching/about/index.html

 

AUA Talks University priorities: SU Top 10

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📥  AUA Talks

Author:  Tom Bond, Postgraduate Research Administrator, Faculty of Engineering & Design

The AUA was pleased to host Lucy Woodcock, SU President and Amy Young, Representation & Engagement Manager, who presented a whirlwind tour of this year’s Top 10 student issues to be dealt with.

This was a great opportunity for staff from across the university to be exposed to problems faced daily, monthly and yearly by our students, and gives us a great insight into the work going on behind the scenes conducted by the SU in to tackling them.

The top 10 issues for 2016/7 are:
• Campaign for sustainable student recruitment policies in relation to housing availability
This is a hot topic, with increasing student numbers and a shifting focus to postgraduates who notoriously struggle more than the undergraduate population to secure affordable accommodation.

Bath is a small town and simply can’t offer the same level of housing stock that larger cities do, but the SU and University are committed to battling the ongoing problem of available housing.

• Make it easier for students to locate available study space
Space is a premium on campus, and the SU are currently working on a plan to have an app in place by the start of 2017/8 academic year that will allow students to easily locate available working spaces/rooms across campus – improving on the current room booking system that is more staff-orientated.

• Improve University and Students’ Union provision for students outside of term time
Efforts are being made to improve provisions for students who remain on campus outside of term-time, including: shop/eatery opening hours, the development of a programme of events over summer/Christmas, and ensuring vital services such as Student Counselling remain at optimum performance during these periods.

• Secure a physical expansion of the gym
The SU has already scored a big win here, securing a £3.5m investment into a new gym facility that will improve provision of sports/exercise classes, as well as providing more equipment and exercise stations on top of the already impressive STV facilities currently available.

There will be an effort to give priority to student memberships over those of the general public to ensure satisfaction of the student body.

• Ensure that students receive constructive assessment feedback that helps them learn
We need to ensure that assessment feedback received by students is constructive, and allows them to build and improve on their work as a result.

The SU is working closely with the Centre for Learning & Teaching to ensure current best practice is spread across the university to make this happen.

• Campaign for the curricula to reflect the diversity of the student body
The student body on campus is hugely diverse, with over 100 nationalities represented. It’s paramount that this is reflected in the University’s curricula.

It is hoped that the University could use this work as part of a bid for the Race Equality Charter Mark .

• Reduce waste across campus
The University is making concerted efforts to improve on waste disposal across campus, an excellent example being the Leave No Trace campaign that encourages using re-usable cups at coffee/tea vendors across campus by offering discounts to those who do.

There is a growing issue of homelessness in Bath, and Lucy rightly presented this as an opportunity to put food waste on campus to good use – there is too much perfectly good, freshly made food that is simply thrown away at the end of each day.

• Ensure the personal tutoring system is effective for students and staff
The personal tutoring system needs to work for both staff and students, and in collaboration with the Senior Tutors Forum, the SU is focused on identifying best practice from across the institution, and also areas for improvement.

• Tackle postgraduate isolation
There is an evident lack of community among some postgraduates at the university, and the SU is working hard to identify the key problems and address then.

The expectations of postgraduates when they arrive are being reviewed, in relation to events, societies and other provisions that otherwise work well for the undergraduate population, with a view to improving/providing additional provisions for the postgraduate population.

For the first time this year there has been a dedicated Postgraduate Officer appointed (Adam Kearns), tasked with the responsibility of ensuring a great postgraduate student experience.

• Secure an extension of the Library
Like the gym, the SU are also working on a plan to extend the current space available in the library. An area of land to the North of the library has been identified for a possible expansion sight, which would offer perhaps a new lecture theatre as well as more working/computer space.

A suggestion has also been put forward to improve the e-journal facilities, and reduce the number of paper journals on level 1, freeing up space for more work stations.

Lucy would like plans for this provision secured by the end of her presidency.

 

AUA Talks Sector Issues: CMA and Immigration

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📥  AUA Talks

Author: Sally Lewis, Placements Officer, Faculty of Science

The first AUA talk of this year was given by Mark Humphriss, the University Secretary, who gave a very informative insight into the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) and immigration - two of the significant issues facing universities today.

Mark began his talk with a brief career history, explaining how his move into higher education at Bath 10 years ago followed 17 years working in a number of roles for the Church of England, including leading a major review of the structures of the Church and working for a national charity and a secondment in the North East. It was through his role managing relationships with the 11 universities of Church of England foundation that he began to have contact with universities and recognised the similarities between the two sectors – both having similar policy issues and working cultures.

Commenting on his move into a new sector, he noted how helpful he found his professional association (the AHUA – the Association of Heads of University Administration) in connecting him with others in HE and enabling him to gain an understanding of the working culture.

In his current role, Mark is part of the senior management of the University - part of the Vice- Chancellor’s Group (VCG) - and has a number of University-wide roles, including chairing the Equality and Diversity Committee and the Emergency Management Team – which has to deal with anything from heavy snow falls on Claverton Down to a field trip stuck in Honduras. On a departmental level, his responsibilities include the Secretariat, the Legal Office and student immigration. Reputation management is a big part of his role and responding to a question about Freedom of Information (FoI), he described the tension between the desire of universities to be open in how they respond to FoI requests and the way in which information once in the public domain, can be used to cause less favourable impressions of those organisations.

Responsibility for events such as degree ceremonies and the operational side of the recent 50th Anniversary celebration also fall under Mark’s remit as does managing the relationship with the Chancellor, which with our current Chancellor, means working within royal protocols as well. The Government’s counter-terrorism Prevent strategy has involved Mark in some interesting and robust discussions with the UCU and the Students’ Union when negotiating policies for external speakers.
Externally, Mark is part of the National Executive of the AHUA and has previously chaired its southern region. He is a Governor of the RUH, a Director of the Office of the Independent Adjudicator and a Trustee of the Holburne Museum.

Moving on to discuss the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), Mark explained that in the last few years the CMA (formerly the Office of Fair Trading) has begun to focus on the practices of higher education institutions and concluded that the university sector was perceived to have too much freedom from consumer regulations, with some institutions levying academic sanctions (such as withholding degree confirmation) for non-academic matters (such as the non-payment of rent) for example.

The CMA has concluded that students (paying £9,000 a year in tuition fees) should be regarded as consumers for the purpose of consumer legislation. This has had a number of far reaching consequences for universities – a number of whom have been publicly named as falling short of CMA legislation. Here at Bath, Mark chairs the Consumer Regulation Steering Group and much work has been done - with Terms and Conditions now being sent to every offer holder and trying to ensure that all information provided on (our over 100,000) web pages and at Open Days, will remain valid throughout the duration of a course. This may involve more generic and less detailed information being in the public domain with students receiving more detailed information about courses once here. He noted that there can be a tension between the desire for transparency and the desire to innovate and progress with course development. Failure to comply with CMA legislation can have financial penalties although the reputational damage of such failure would potentially be more detrimental.

Mark concluded his talk by discussing the significant consequences for universities of the current political agenda around immigration. Attendance monitoring of students holding Tier 4 visas is a mandatory requirement for universities. Failure to meet requirements can lead to a university losing its license to sponsor visas – resulting in the institution not being able to recruit international students and its current students having to leave the country, a huge impact for any institution. At Bath the increase in processes and resource needed to fulfil this requirement has led to the recent establishment of the Student Immigration Service of 13 staff. Universities also have to operate in an environment where rule changes have been brought into force with little or no notice or consultation with the sector. This was illustrated in April this year, where changes resulted in those students extending their course - to undertake a placement, for example - having to return to their home countries at short notice to extend their visas. As well as concerns for students, Mark also noted concerns for the implications of changes on international staff.

… and with that our time was up. Many thanks to Mark for his time and for this glimpse into the working life of our University Secretary.

 

Sign up to the AUA talks for 2016/17

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📥  AUA Talks

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Colleagues across the University -AUA members AND non-members alike- are warmly invited to attend all AUA talks this year

AUA Bath members have identified three themes for this coming year, our sessions will cover:

• Sector issues
• University priorities
• Career progression

A list of sessions booked so far are below with sign up details to attend:

23 November 2016: CMA and Immigration – Mr Mark Humphriss (University Secretary)
http://www.bath.ac.uk/whats-on/getevent.php?currDay=23&currMonth=11&currYear=2016

29 November 2016: Students’ Union Top Ten – Miss Amy Young (Representation & Engagement Manager) & Miss Lucy Woodcock (SU President)
http://www.bath.ac.uk/whats-on/getevent.php?currDay=29&currMonth=11&currYear=2016

5 December 2016: The Centre for Learning and Teaching – Professor Andrew Heath (Academic Director)
http://www.bath.ac.uk/whats-on/getevent.php?currDay=5&currMonth=12&currYear=2016

11 January 2017: Strategy & planning - Professor Bernie Morley (Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Provost)
http://www.bath.ac.uk/whats-on/getevent.php?currDay=11&currMonth=1&currYear=2017

Please sign up, come along and engage with the future.

Further details on the AUA and local activity here at Bath (including our new membership deal) can be found by clicking on the following links:

http://blogs.bath.ac.uk/aua/

http://www.aua.ac.uk/

Or follow us on Twitter: @AUA_Bath OR #AUABath