Careers Perspectives – from the Bath careers service

Focus on your future with expert advice from your careers advisers

Topic: Advice

Christmas Careers Advice Corner

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📥  Advice, Tips & Hints

Christmas Careers Advice Corner

Snowy christmas norway

 


In just over a week’s time I am off home to Norway for Christmas. It is one of my favourite times of the year going home, and this time my sister tells me there is snow on the ground! So here I will share some of what I am looking forward to at Christmas and how this can help  you in your career planning.

  • Decorating the tree – we always decorate tree on the 23 December, a lot later than most of my friends here in the UK. Decorating the tree always takes a lot of planning, but it always looks nice at the end. So how are you going to plan to gain awareness of potential career pathways or job roles for 2018? I suggest you use a couple of hours researching our wonderful careers resources and explore the tree and branches of sectors and jobs out there.
  • Reflecting on the year gone by – I always have a lot of time on my hand during Christmas as I have a very small family. With a cup of hot chocolate in one hand and a pen in the other, I sometimes write down notes of reflection in my diary. What went well, what went not so well and how can I improve things for next year? Reflection is a useful careers tool too – here is a great article by Open University on self-reflection which may help you think about how this last Autumn  term went for you.
  • Spending time with family and friends – I can’t wait to see my sister again and spend some quality time with her and also see an old school friend in Oslo. You never know how seeing friends and family can inspire you in thinking of new career ideas or support you in getting new contacts in your job search. I also know that sometimes seeing family can be difficult, especially if you feel low as you have not secured a graduate job… yet. There is still time to find one! Here is a previous blog entry on coping with rejection which you may find useful.
  • Having a cup of tea in front of the fire – well, this is my favourite past-time. Staring into the fire, feeling warm and fully relaxing, perhaps reading a book at the same time. I think my most important piece of advice over Christmas is to take a few days out to really relax and take your mind off exams, job hunt or university. Go for a walk, sleep in and spoil yourself with a food and snacks, play in the snow! That way you will come back more refreshed for a new semester. If you still are finding it difficuly getting your mind away from exam stress, this earlier blog entry on managing your time around exams may help you. The Wellbeing Service here at Bath are also available to support you before and after Christmas and have a range of activities for  you who are staying in Bath during Christmas.

Lastly, here is a reminder of our Christmas opening hours, please do contact us if you need any further support or inspiration. We are closed from Friday 22 December to 3 January. Please see at the bottom of this link for details of our opening hours.

 

 

 

 

 

Postgraduate Study and Personal Statements

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📥  Advice, Applications, Postgraduate Study

Postgraduate Study and Personal Statements

 

I have seen a few students in quick query appointments worried about their personal statements and I therefore thought I would write a quick guide with regards to writing personal statements for postgraduate study.


Event Alert: For those of you interested in postgraduate study in the humanities and social sciences sector, the faculty is running a great information session this Friday December 1st on applying for postgraduate programmes locally, nationally and internationally, and where to look for funding sources. Book your place through MyFuture.


The slight differences in personal statements

Pretty much all postgraduate courses and institutions will ask you to write some sort of personal statements, but be aware that the word limit may be different from institution to institution and each department may also ask you to answer specific questions. It is therefore vital that you always read through the application instructions on the university website before starting. You don’t want to write a two page personal statement and later realise you only have 4000 characters to use.

There are different application formats with regards to different career pathways, for example some postgraduate courses use UKPASS. However, you should always find specific application instructions on the individual university websites, so these are therefore key to research.  See some great information from University of Manchester with regards to personal statements for PGCE and medicine. Getting into Teaching also has great advice on writing personal statements for PGCE.

What not to do in personal statements

Typical errors in personal statements is not being clear about why you would like to do the postgraduate course, poor structure and bad spelling and grammar. It also shows if you have not done the research needed with regards to the university and the course you are applying for. Even if you are applying to similar postgraduate degrees at different universities the particular universities and programmes would still like to know why you are choosing them.

Typical content for your personal statements

Again, always read the specific application instructions for your chosen programmes, but this is the typical content of a personal statement. See our careers resource for more details.

  •  Why this University? Why this programme?

As said above there needs to a clear reason for why you are applying to that particular University and that particular postgraduate programme. Is it the location, what about particular research interest of the academics in the departments? Have you been to campus before? Does the department have good alumni networks or industry opportunities? What about the subject motivates you? Are the particular modules or course options that interests you?

  • An insight into your overall abilities (academic, work, extra-curricular and more) and how these experiences have prepared you for the course

What have you done so far that will make sure that you are successful studying the postgraduate degree? Have you completed any relevant research projects, dissertation, relevant module work? It is important to connect what you are doing now academically to what you would like to study on the programme. Have you had any relevant work experience or any senior roles in societies or clubs at University? Or perhaps you have had some personal achievements that should be mentioned? These experiences should also include examples of skills that are essential to be successful in the course such as communication skills (presentations, written reports, group work) or relevant scientific techniques, analytical or research skills.

  • A sense that the course links to what you have done in the past and how it relates to what you want to do in the future

It is important to connect your past experiences and what you hope to get out of the course to what you want to do in the future. Where do you see yourself working/doing after the course has finished? The admissions tutor won’t find you in a couple of years’ time to see if you are in the job role you describe in your statement but they would like you to have an awareness of career pathways and an understanding of the reasons for taking the course

  • Last but not least, they want to see motivation and enthusiasm!!

This is key to a good personal statement. Your motivation and enthusiasm should shine through and the reasons should be clear. No need to be too emotional, but a reflective and enthusiastic approach and backing these up with evidence is what they would like to see.

Final piece of advice, have your personal tutor read through it as well! Their academic perspective is very valuable when writing a statement.

I wish you the best of luck in writing your personal statement.

Further resources:

 

Interview practice - any time, anywhere!

  

📥  Advice, Interviews


Ah, interviews. Sooner or later, we all have to have them - whether it's for a placement, a summer internship, postgraduate study or the graduate job of your dreams. But they are not the most looked-forward-to of events. Or the most thoughtfully timed. Ghislaine Dell, Careers Adviser, shares her thoughts on how to practise for a video interview in this apt blog entry.

Does this sound like you?

"Yay! I have an interview! Oh no, it's the day after tomorrow and I really need some practice!"

Or...

"Oh no, it says that the interview is a video one and I have no idea how that will work let alone how I am going to come over on camera...."

As you know, in the Careers Service we are always very happy to help with interview preparation in our quick query appointments and do offer practice interviews, but there are times when we can't offer practice interviews, you don't have the slots free, or you don't have gaps in your timetables, or actually you really really want to practise using the video interview format.

So, we are delighted to say that we can help you with that as well!

InterviewStream is a video interview platform which offers you the opportunity to build your own video interview from a bank of thousands of questions, take the interview, and review your performance and comment on it at a later date. Or maybe you can send the video file to a friend or a family member for comments? We have also built you a portfolio of ready-made interviews that you can choose from.

Thanks to the generosity of the Alumni Fund, and supported by the MBA Careers Office, all registered Bath students can access this package on an unlimited basis. Simply register using your Computing Services email and take it from there. You'll find fuller details and login instructions on this page.

There is even a handy 'um, like' counter to use when you watch back your interview so you can see how many of those dreaded filler words you are using!

So, have a go! And do tell us if there are targeted interview sets that you would like us to build. Your feedback will be very gratefully received and it will help us build a more useful service.

You can find more interview resources on our Bath Careers page.

 

Introducing the Careers Fair app - Summer Internship Fair

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📥  Advice, Careers Fairs, Internships, Networking, Uncategorized

Introducing the Careers Fair app - Summer Internship Fair


On Friday 17th November we are running our much anticipated Summer Internship Fair in the Founders' Hall from 10am - 3pm. At this event you can find out everything about summer placements, some are also open to all years and all degree disciplines, so there is something here for all students, whatever year or degree discipline. I hope to see you there!

This year we are trialing the use of a new app. You can download this to find out more about the Fair and the exhibitors by searching the App store or Google Play for "Career Fair Plus''. Then, select University of Bath from the list of universities and you'll see the Summer Internship Fair. Download and see for yourself!

Today, browsing through, I found information about 27 different employers, what their target degree disciplines are, what opportunities are available and even how to apply, all in a couple of clicks. In addition, it gives you a direct link to the fair map layout and where the employer is situated. This way you can walk directly up to the employer without having to lose time finding out where their booth is.

You can also find more information about the event and the employers present on our Bath Careers website and on MyFuture - Summer Internships Fair

What are your next steps?

  1. Read the information about the employers on the app or on the above link
  2. Plan which employers you want to see and where they are situated in the fair
  3. Prepare questions in advance - if you are wondering what to ask then we have an excellent previous blog entry and a careers guide - Prepare for the Fair (both cover advice for our main fair in October but a lot of the information is still valid for the summer internship fair).
  4. Bring a CV - just in case
  5. Show up - learn about organisations, explore summer job opportunities and have fun!

See you on Friday!

 

 

The dreaded "Do you have any questions for us?" moment in an interview!

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📥  Advice, Interviews, Tips & Hints

I have delivered a few interview skills talks and workshops recently and one part of the interview students almost always fear is at the end when the recruiter asks you: "Do you have any questions for us?" This blog post written by our Careers Adviser Saiyada Fazal gives you important advice and information about exactly how to tackle this dreaded part of the interview.


It can be all too easy to get towards the end of a job interview and not ask any questions. Because, let's face it, all you probably want to know is 'have I got the job?' and 'how much will it pay?' But the questions you ask your prospective employer are just as important as the answers you give during an interview.

Although job interviews often feel like an interrogation, they're meant to be a conversation between you and a potential employer. Asking the right questions during a job interview can not only help you build a dialogue, but it can also help you evaluate if the job is right for you.

So, lets start with questions you shouldn't ask during an interview:

  • How much will you pay / what is the benefits package / how much holiday will I get / what are my work hours?*
  • What happened to the last person who did this job?
  • Can you explain what your business does?
  • When can I start using the company discount?

The reason for avoiding these questions during an interview is that you want to use the opportunity, to demonstrate your drive to excel in the role and the fact that you've done some homework (researched the company, industry and department). You want to leave the employer with a positive and memorable impression of you as a potential candidate.

A general rule is that you should ask no more than two questions (the employer may have other candidates they are interviewing and you don't want to hijack their time). The best questions are open ended and don't ask for information that can easily be found on the organisations website. Avoid negative or aggressive questions, you want to focus on building a rapport with the interviewer.

Examples of good questions to ask during an interview:

Can you tell me how the role relates to the overall structure of the organisation? with this question you're drawing attention to a preference for teamwork. It looks as though you want to know where you would fit in and how your contribution would affect the rest of the company.

How would you describe the work culture here? this signals that you want to operate at your optimum and understand that for this you require a positive environment. This indicates you're a good self-manager who is aware of how to get the best out of yourself.

What do you think are the most important qualities for someone to excel in this role? this question can often lead to valuable information that’s not in the job description. It can help you learn about the company culture and expectations so you can show that you are a good fit.

In what way is performance measured and reviewed? this question flags up that you appreciate the importance of delivering real results. You will be seen as someone who understands the value of commitment, reliability and returns.

What are the most important issues that you think your business is currently facing? or I have noticed, you recently introduced a new product/service/division/project; how will this benefit the business? these variations both show that you are interested in the job and employer behind it too. It also shows you have researched the organisation which demonstrates motivation.

If you decide you genuinely have no questions to ask, then turn this into an opportunity by saying, "at this stage I haven't got any questions. This is because I spent time looking through your website and read up on current projects. I also spoke to Mr. Smith at the Bath careers fair, who talked to me about the organisation culture and business priorities such as x. Therefore, at this stage I don't have any questions".

* Remember you can still clarify hours of work, salary and holidays by having a separate conversation with representatives from the organisations HR department after your interview.

If you need further interview resources, please have a look at our Succeed in the Selection Process on our website and read through our excellent Interview Guide.

Good luck in your interviews!

 

Being a Final Year Student –Managing your academic work and finding time to apply for jobs!!

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📥  Advice, Finding a Job, Tips & Hints

Being a Final Year –Managing your academic work and finding time to apply for jobs!!


“No one warned me that my final year would be like this!” said a student that I had seen earlier this week. It’s not easy to juggle academic work and job applications deadlines, as well as find time to attend interviews and assessment centres all in the autumn semester. So how can you survive and ensure that you achieve your desired goals without burnout? Here are some tips for getting through the next few weeks.


This blog entry was posted in a previous academic year by Melanie Wortham, Careers Adviser, but is still very relevant for students today.


Setting Goals - Set yourself specific and clearly defined goals, and make sure that these are realistic and achievable. To do this, you first need to examine your present situation and assess what goals are important to you and what action you need to take to achieve your target. You may decide that getting a 2:1 is your priority and therefore you may have to limit the number of jobs you apply for. Decide which are the most important companies for you to target based upon factors such as closing date, location, degree class required, and chances of getting in.  Have a contingency plan or alternative route to your goal in case you have to change your plans, for example, consider taking a relevant postgraduate course, or a temporary job where you might gain relevant experience which moves you closer to your goal.

Avoid Procrastination – It’s very easy just to do nothing or get distracted on lots of other more interesting activities or tasks and then not attempt the important tasks! Don’t put off starting something which will then lead to further action. Many applications to large employers need to be made in the first term of your final year and if you procrastinate you'll miss the deadlines.

Write a To Do List – Writing a list like this takes away a huge amount of stress as these tasks can then be slotted into your calendar at a time when you think you can get them done. However, do take a look at your list and prioritise those things which need to be done earlier. Keep reviewing your list and updating it.

Organising Your Time – If you are finding it difficult to fit everything in, then keep a time log and see where you might be wasting some time, or be able to make more use of time. When applying for jobs keep copies of all the applications you have made and keep a log of the date you applied, result, and a record of all your interviews, plus any questions you were asked, particularly those questions you found challenging. This will help you to keep track of your progress and spot areas where you could improve.

Break down Tasks into smaller tasks – Getting started on a job application is the hardest thing. So if you have a spare half hour, why not start an application or do a bit of a research on the company for that interview. For example, most applications now are online, information can be saved and returned to at a later date for editing. The first part is mainly your personal details which takes a while, but doesn’t require a huge amount of thought as you probably have all this on a CV. You will feel a sense of achievement that you have started. Then tackle those difficult questions one by one as you have time, but remember to keep an eye on deadlines.

Perseverance -  Learn how to take a positive attitude towards failure. Perhaps, you didn’t get shortlisted for interview or didn’t get through the assessment centre this time. Try to ask for feedback from the employer or come and see us here at Careers to discuss how you might improve next time. Talk things over with your friends who may have similar experiences to share and can offer advice to you. Don’t despair as mistakes are a crucial part of any learning process. It is said that the people who have achieved the most have made the most mistakes!

Be Kind to Yourself! Make sure during your final year you do find time to enjoy yourself and relax. Find time to do some sport or go shopping with friends or have a night out. Reward yourself if you get shortlisted for interview or make it to the final stages of an assessment centre.

Help is at Hand – The Careers Service offers support to all students and graduates. We are open from 9.30 – 5:00pm Monday to Friday in the Virgil Building, city centre. You can come in and have a CV or application checked, get support in finding a job or researching employer or discuss what to do next. You can find details about our services and appointment here.

And remember - The secret of getting ahead is getting started. ~Mark Twain

 

Thinking about a Career in Teaching Part 2

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📥  Advice, Sector Insight, Tips & Hints, Uncategorized

Part 2 of our “Thinking about a Career in Teaching” blog focuses today on Schools Direct route (SCITT), Teach First, PGCE (FE), resources and support for potential teachers with a disability. LATEST NEWS! Find out about a scheme to reimburse student loan repayments!

Schools Direct – School-centred initial teacher training (SCITT)

A SCITT is an accredited body with links to the Dfe and where groups of schools get together to provide on the job training.  A SCITT will often offer every secondary subject if they can because of the scale of the operation. They also tend to target mature students if it is expensive to live in the area and difficult to attract young graduates. All trainees are called Associate Teachers to get the respect and all courses are registered on UCAS with salaried and non-salaried SCITTs available.

One important thing to check when looking for places is the actual number of places available as if a SCITT is advertising history or PE, they may only have the one place. For further information on SCITT see here.

Teach First

The Teach First route is now pretty well known and is fully funded and salaried and available in 11 different areas. It also has partnering organisations such as the Navy and PwC. Target areas are rural and coastal as these are the areas where it has been difficult to recruit teachers.  Teach First will cover Early Years, Primary and Secondary. On this programme you would be teaching curriculum subjects but the different to other schemes is that you do not necessarily need a degree in that subject as Teach First will also consider any relevant A Levels.

The advice for students with non-curriculum subject is to ring the TF admissions so for example if you are studying a humanities subject you may be advised to apply for English.

You will currently need a 2:1 and 300 UCAS points but UCAS points are likely to be dropped very shortly. It is hoped that this will encourage more students from widening participation backgrounds to apply who may have been taught in TF schools and are inspired to teach but may have lower grades. It’s important to note that although there is minimum criteria, no-one is told not to apply. The PGDE is fully funded by TF which is a school based programme, with some teaching days at a university. New recruits are also allocated TF mentors. This programme awards QTS after year 1 and then PGDE and NQT status the following year.

Whilst you are on the programme you have the opportunity to do Insight Days in partner organisations in the First Year, and in the Second Year –years 2 week internship offered with partner organisations.

If you are applying in your penultimate year of degree then it is possible to be offered 1st choice in location. Interesting statistics for the Teach First Scheme show that 60% stay on to teach and after 15 years 80% are back in teaching. Generally TF teachers will get promotion faster within their TF schools. For more information see Teach First. https://www.teachfirst.org.uk/

Teach First will be doing a presentation on 14th November and you can speak to them on the parade on the 9th and 14th November. Check www.myfuture.bath.ac.uk for more details.

PGCE (FE)

If you are considering teaching in an FE college you can take a PGCE which leads to QTLS but not QTS. Most students on this PGCE have a job or placement prior to doing the course. If not, help is given to find a placement. If you are interested in this qualification you would apply Direct and not through UCAS. Graduates who hold a third degree classification may be able to enter this course if they have a good reason for their final mark.

Concentration in FE colleges is on the 16-18 age group so you will not get experience of the 14-16 age group.  If you are considering maybe doing guest lecturers at an FE College in addition to another job then you won’t need a PGCE and can simply apply to do a six day course.

Psychology graduates have more opportunities to teach in FE. You would normally accept a lecturing post and then be trained.

It is important to note though that career prospects in FE are less well paid than a teacher and less secure.

Latest news - Bursaries and English Teachers Required

From September 2017 there will be more apprenticeship routes for students as Trainee Lecturers at the college or apprentice teachers. Bursaries available £9K for English. The reason behind this is that many 16 year olds have to redo English or Maths and therefore have to stay in education so there is a larger requirement for lecturers in this area.

Resources and Support for Potential Teachers with a Disability

There are 6.9 million disabled people of working age.  9% of teaching applications were from people declaring a disability, yet less than 1% of the teaching workforce has a disability.

Often students won’t declare on an application form and declare it afterwards to the admissions officer or personal tutor whilst on placement. However, students are really encouraged to declare any disability on the UCAS application form so that adaptions can be made for the interview if required, but also any reasonable adjustments when considering the teaching aspect and the placements.

There are specific forums to support disabled students such as the Disability Teaching Network Other resources produced by the Careers professional body AGCAS are available to support potential teachers with a disability. If you would like information on these then please do book to see a Careers Adviser by emailing careers@bath.ac.uk

International Students

International students can get on to PGCE courses. There are also cases of international students taking course in Independent schools. Perseverance pays off as there is a case of an international student convincing school that they could sponsor her and they did.

Scottish Students

If doing the PGCE in England, when they start, they need to contact the Scottish body so that they can do the QTS in Scotland afterwards.

Reimbursing Student Loan Repayments

The DfE have just announced details of a pilot programme for reimbursing the student loan repayments made by some teachers in the first ten years after they gain Qualified Teacher Status, with the intention of improving recruitment and retention is areas where this is most challenging.

In order to be able to claim reimbursements a teacher must meet these criteria:

·         Have been awarded QTS between 2014 and 2019

·         Be employed by a maintained secondary school, a special school or a secondary phase academy/free school

·         Have taught languages, physics, chemistry, biology or computer science for at least 50% of their contracted hours during the year they are claiming for

·         Be in a school within one of the 25 participating local authorities

·         Still be teaching when you apply for reimbursement

The participating authorities are: Barnsley; Blackpool; Bracknell Forest; Bradford; Cambridgeshire; Derby; Derbyshire; Doncaster; Halton; Knowsley; Luton; Middlesbrough; Norfolk; North East Lincolnshire; North Yorkshire; Northamptonshire; Northumberland; Oldham; Peterborough; Portsmouth; Salford; Sefton; St Helens; Stoke-on-Trent; Suffolk.

Full details are available here.

If you would like to discuss any of the teaching routes with a Careers Adviser do book an appointment through www.myfuture.bath.ac.uk

On a final note!

This blog was written with the latest information on teaching that is currently available. However, teaching routes and different schemes are constantly changing so if you are reading this blog several months after it was published then do remember to check out the government website for any future changes! Get into Teaching 

 

So you want to work with Robots....

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📥  Advice, Career Choice, Commercial Awareness, Finding a Job, For PhDs, For Taught Postgraduates, inspire, Subject Related Careers, Tips & Hints

Earlier this year, I read this article on the Guardian which in a nutshell suggested, Robots will be our bosses in the future. As machine learning improves, the robotics sector is booming and who knows what the possibilities are. According to Recruitment buzz, there has been a five fold increase in the number of jobs in AI. Currently, there are more than double the number of jobs than applicants – with companies fighting to grab the best talent. In fact the job market in the next 10-15 years will be totally different with job titles that are yet to be born.

According to Robert Hillard, managing partner at Deloitte, future work will fall in one of three categories:

  1. People who work for machines such as drivers, online store pickers and some health professionals who are working to a schedule.
  2. People who work with machines such as surgeons using machines to help with diagnosis.
  3. People who work on the machines, such as programmers and designers

AI/Robotics is an evolving field and is still organic in its development. Therefore the market hasn't created a set career path or indeed  established entry requirements. However if you wish to work as a programmer or designer within robotics, it may be worth considering postgraduate study. Graduate schemes with companies like Microsoft, where you can pursue a technical pathway may enable you to move internally into their Robotics department. Recently the Guardian hosted a Q&A about starting a career in robotics, the tips below are worth considering:

  1. Motivation is key to getting your foot through the door. Upskill your coding skills – consider doing a MOOC (Coursera, Udemy, O’Reillys Safari and Kaggle are useful starting points).
  2. Ensure you are building a solid background in C/C++
  3. CognitionX provides a useful way to stay on top of developments.
  4. Get involved in Open Source projects, you’ll develop a network and also learn about the latest workflow processes.
  5. Robotics isn’t just about hard-core coding, there are plenty of opportunities working with datasets for example to influence marketing. There will be growth in support roles such as HR as start ups expand.
  6. The field is ‘Industry-neutral’ – you could work in manufacturing to preventing fraud, to interpreting medical devises to pricing up insurance. Almost every company will have an interest in AI / Robotics.
  7. Don’t expect a straight forward career path, this is a field that is evolving all the time.

Companies leading in Robotics /AI:

  •  Amazon – there are lots of opportunities  in technical as well as business / support roles.
  • Social media companies such as Facebook and Twitter offer interesting graduate schemes in data analytics and in development based roles.
  • You’ve all heard of Elon Musk founder of Tesla, Space X and OpenAI. Worth looking at graduate jobs with them.
  • Other experts in the field include Google (DeepMind), Universal Robotics (Denmark) and Element AI (Canada)
  • Finally, this article from Business Insider lists 10 British AI companies to look out for. It’s worth noting lots of opportunities within Start-ups and also the wide range of fields AI / Robotics touch upon.

Now, like me if you watched the Terminator films, you'd quite rightly have concerns about 'this' super-intelligence escaping human control and Skynet becoming a reality...... ah well, this is a blog post for another day.....

 

Career Planning Checklist for First Years

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📥  Advice, Tips & Hints, Uncategorized, Work Experience

Career Planning Checklist for First Years


I hope you have enjoyed the first few weeks on campus!  In the next few years you may make friends for life and acquire knowledge that will inspire you in many different directions, I know it did for me! You might already wonder about what you would like to do with your degree and what you will learn here at Bath. Your first year is all about finding out who you are, what you like to do, what you are good at, what you are not so good at and creating friendships and networks. Your career journey actually starts here, today, and I have several ideas about how you can start exploring.

Get involved!

This is the time to join student societies and clubs. Do you like to juggle or debate politics? It is for you to find out. Would you like to have an active voice on campus?  Join societies, student committees or join roles in the Students’ Union.

Get work or volunteer experience!

I had no idea what I wanted to do after my degree when I started, so I explored many different roles and acquired many different skills which became useful later. Working in catering taught me I don’t like working with food but I love talking to customers! Working as a market researcher taught me I don’t like speaking on the phone, but I enjoy writing up company marketing reports. I volunteered in translation, which confirmed my interest in languages. Being a student advisor in the Study Abroad Office my last year at University taught me that I enjoy supporting students decide about their future, and became the reason why I started working in student support and ending up as a Careers Adviser. So my advice to you is to get experience, try different jobs and volunteering roles. Explore who you are!

Start writing your CV!

To apply for work experience and volunteering roles, you may need to have an updated CV. So why not start that now? It will also be so much easier to add to the CV later on if you start early, believe me! There are several CV writing workshops and talks you can join through MyFuture – our careers portal to events, talks, workshops and for booking appointments. We also have a great CV writing resource to get your started.

Does all this peak your interest? Come and visit us!

We are open everyday and we always have time to speak to you. We are now based in city centre, near the station in the Virgil Building. We have lots of resources, both online and in the centre, for you to look through. We have Careers Advisers for you to book appointments with, to share your ideas and thoughts.  We offer a range of appointments and support, please see our website for more details. We even have a page dedicated to you, first year students.

Here are further links for you to explore:

-          MyFuture – your links to careers appointments, skills development training, employer events, jobs and internships.

-          Bath Careers website – A great resource for all things careers, from writing a CV and succeeding in an assessment centre to exploring employers and taking a gap year.

-          Joblink – The Students' Union's part-time job portal, if you would like a part-time job alongside your studies.

-          Students’ Union – great resource for all things SU.

But most of all, ENJOY your first year at Bath.

 

The Employers Are Coming – Get Prepared for The Careers Fair!

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📥  Advice, Career Choice, Careers Fairs, Finding a Job, Graduate Jobs, Tips & Hints

The Employers Are Coming – Get Prepared for The Careers Fair!


On Thursday and Friday 19th and 20th October the employers are coming to campus! We will have around 200 employers over the two days from a range of different sectors. This is a unique opportunity for Bath graduates, undergraduates and postgraduates of any year to meet a range of employers in one venue, and will give you the chance to ask questions and assess the types of jobs on offer in an informal setting. Remember this is not just for graduate roles, there are also employers offering summer internships and placements.

The 2017 fair will be held from 11am to 4pm both days, and will be at the Sports Training Village (Netball Courts).

So how do you prepare for the careers fair? Well here are few tips for you:

 

  • Research the employers coming to the fair. The leaflet is out and you can download it from our website.  There are employers from a range of sectors within business and engineering, but we also have charities and public sector represented by organisations such as Cancer Research UK, Department of Education, Welsh Government, Frontline and Teach First. A lot of commercial companies also recruit students from all disciplines so there is something here for anyone, whatever your degree.
  • Plan your visit! Which employers do you want to see and where are they? Make sure to target the employers and find out where they are by checking the Careers Fair map.
  • Prepare questions for the employers you are interested in. The answers may make you decide on what career pathways are best for you or may inspire you to apply for a summer internship or a graduate role. Questions may cover a range of subjects. Maybe you are curious about the day to day work activities, the culture of the workplace? Or maybe you would like to know what type of skills or experiences they are looking for so that you can tailor your job application or prepare for a future interview? Maybe you want to learn more about the industry or the sector, the current issues or developments?  Have a think about what you would like to know and prepare your questions beforehand. Avoid asking the companies what they do, researching the companies or organisations beforehand should help you with that! More ideas for questions to ask can be found here.
  • Wear something nice. No need to wear a suit or business attire, but avoid looking scruffy or avoid looking like you have just just come from the gym. First impressions counts, even at a careers fair.
  • Prepare your CV. You never know when an opportunity arises to give an employer your CV. If you would like some feedback on your CV, have a look at our excellent CV guide and come to one of our quick query appointments to have it looked over. You can book these appointments through MyFuture.

Finally, just be yourself and enjoy the day. We hope that you will come out of the fair with ideas, inspiration and knowledge that you can use further in  your career.

For more information, see our website for more details or on how to prepare for the Careers Fair, have a look at our Careers Fair Guide.