Careers Perspectives – from the Bath careers service

Focus on your future with expert advice from your careers advisers

Topic: Career Choice

Employer Monday: Morgan Stanley

📥  Career Choice, Diversity, Employer Visit Report, Sector Insight

Welcome back to another Employer Monday blog post! If you read my previous blogs you’ll recall I often talk to employers to find out how they might like to work with Universities and recruit our students. Remember; I’m not a Careers Advisor, this is not advice or guidance, but I’m happy to share my experiences with you!
And, as ever, bear in mind my fickle nature which is prone to falling for every new employer!
The employer visit I’ll tell you about today is a Morgan Stanley…

GETTING THERE
Who doesn’t love a trip to Canary Wharf! Super-busy, clever people running between meetings in power suits and trainers, hugging espressos and smart phones; huge, USA-style buildings made of glass, glittering in the daylight; it is rather like being in New York. But cleaner…
It’s a quick train and Tube ride to Canary Wharf from Bath – no more than 2 hours door-to-door on a good day. Finding Canary Wharf is a breeze – finding a specific bank in Canary Wharf is trickier as whilst they like their buildings big and flashy, they seem to go minimal when it comes to signage! Morgan Stanley like to trick you too – they have not one building on Canary Wharf but two! Fortunately the whole place feels no bigger than campus so even I wasn’t disorientated for long.

WHAT ABOUT MORGAN STANLEY?
It’s another huge, global investment bank right? I must admit, now I have visited a few I am slightly jaded (I know, me! The eternal optimist). They all have amazing graduate programmes, they all have opportunities by the bagful for bright, young things keen to cut their teeth in the world of Finance.
Morgan Stanley are not dissimilar; you can work in Sales and Trading, Global Capital Markets, Quantitative Finance, Investment Banking. You can do Spring Insight, Internships, Graduate Programmes.
But what I liked about Morgan Stanley was their attitude to their own staff. I heard from a chap who joined Morgan Stanley ten years ago having performed very poorly in his Zoology degree and floated between jobs and travelling for a number of months after graduation. After almost a year, he started on a graduate scheme at Morgan Stanley and hasn’t looked back. Now MD of Institutional Equity Division he admitted he still didn’t really ‘get’ finance but his job was to be good with people and win new business and Morgan Stanley had recognised in him, and enabled him to develop, this skillset to succeed.
Morgan Stanley were very clear that there ‘was no room for egos’ and the principle of working there is that you succeed and fail as a team. They have two graduate intakes per year and even these can be negotiated because they encourage new recruits to take a break or go travelling after completely their studies. One-to-one support is provided for new recruits – especially if your degree discipline is not in Finance. Morgan Stanley feel very strongly that they are recruiting the ‘right people’ (but from a mix of degree disciplines, backgrounds, etc) so if things aren’t working out they look at what they are doing wrong; have they got someone in the wrong position or department? After a period, graduates are offered the chance to move in the organisation to find a better fit.
Now I know that lots of big corporates are now talking about diversity and how they treat their staff, but looking back at Morgan Stanley’s history, it does appear that they’ve always had a bit of a social conscience; back in 1940 they raised $1.5million (that was a lot back then) for the US Committee for the Care of European Children.

So here I go again, considering a career change! I don’t have a Finance degree but I’m no Zoologist either, I’m sure there will be something…
If you fancy working somewhere like Morgan Stanley, have a peek at their website for more on Graduate Programmes and the like. And don’t forget to compare the competition; check out Goldman Sachs or Charles Schwab for a start.

 

Employer Monday: Unlocked Grads

📥  Career Choice, Employer Visit Report, Labour Market Intelligence, Sector Insight

Hey everybody, Employer Services Manager here again – for more employer insights! If you read my previous blogs you’ll recall I often talk to employers to find out how they might like to work with Universities and recruit our students. As I’ve said before; I’m not a Careers Advisor, this blog post is not about giving advice or guidance, but I’m happy to share my experiences with you! I sometimes get carried away with my giddiness at learning about new places so please make sure to double-check my account against official websites…

And also remember that whilst I am officially an adult, I still don’t know what I want to be when I grow up and my fickle ambitions change every time I speak to a new employer!

The employer I’ll tell you about today is a bit different – Unlocked Grads.

Who are they?

Due to the nature of their business (which I’ll explain in due course), I didn’t visit Unlocked Grads but rather had lengthy conversations with them. Set up by the Ministry of Justice on the back of a 2015 commissioned report, Unlocked Grads is a relatively new organisation.

The premise of their business is basically recruiting graduates into prison jobs. It really intrigued me – I have never had ambitions to work in prisons but it definitely piqued my interest when I considered the opportunities and challenges! Surely it is rewarding to contribute to someone’s rehabilitation back into society? But at the same time, it’s all a bit scary!! And how do they make this appealing to graduates?

So what is it all about?

Unlocked Grads offer a two year programme of experience in the prison service with the opportunity to complete a masters. The scheme is open to career-changers as well as graduates and they aren’t worried about your degree discipline or previous work experience. You just need a 2:1 and some specific attributes including all the usual stuff; leadership, decision-making, resilience, motivation and then – my favourite – ‘a sense of possibility’. Their website says ‘You need to have a positive outlook and have the courage to drive forward transformational change in society as well as at an individual level’, and I think that’s really inspiring! Prison Officers don’t just jangle keys and lock people up, the British justice system is built upon the principles of rehabilitation and reintegration, so Prison Officers are also required to provide support, encouragement and ultimately a ‘role model’.
Unlocked Grads encourages graduates – who become Entry Level Prison Officers - to build positive relationships with inmates in order to encourage rehabilitation and ultimately prevent re-offending. And surely, if you get it right, that’s a pretty rewarding job?

The programme lasts for two years and then you can walk away with your Masters. Unlocked Grads are working with large corporates to identify opportunities for careers after completion. But I guess, whilst you do not have to stay with the Prison Service, they are probably hoping some will! And if you leave, they will have had enthusiastic, educated graduates who have provided two years of service as a minimum.

The first cohort started in summer 2017 so the longer term outcomes and results are yet to be seen but it is definitely one I’ll be watching. 60 new recruits took up positions in 6 prisons in and around London and I’ll keep my eyes peeled for any updates or success stories and share them here. I’m guessing it looks pretty impressive on a CV? If you can hold your own in a prison environment, a corporate boardroom would seem like a breeze!

I might get to work on my ‘sense of possibility’ and consider that career change…

If prison work sounds a little out of your comfort zone, make sure you check out Teach First which is a similar programme but in schools rather than prisons!

 

Thinking about a career in teaching - Part 1

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📥  Career Choice, inspire, Sector Insight, Tips & Hints, Uncategorized

Many students consider teaching as a career option during their time at University. In October we had a Getting into Teaching event so I thought it would be very timely to give a teaching update and what routes are available to get into teaching as there is a lot of choice out there! Many graduates choose to do a PGCE in Higher Education, but it’s worth investigating other routes into teaching. Last week for example we heard the news of the apprenticeship route into teaching.

As there are several routes to cover there will be two blogs – Part 1 and Part 2! Today’s blog will look at Bursaries, EYTS, Primary and Primary and Secondary PGCE and the new postgraduate apprenticeships. This blog will give you a quick overview on the different routes and a few key pointers on what to consider when making your decision from some teaching professionals. However, for further detail do check out the main government website on Getting into Teaching at https://getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/

Those entering teacher training remains fairly static. However, school led routes have grown now to around 56%. The Government has targets by subjects of number of teachers needed and as applications for Business Studies, Chemistry, music and PE are down were down in 2016, it is likely there will be a real push to increase more places in these subject areas.

So how many routes are there into teaching? Well, there are HEI led, School led, and Specialist routes and options within these.

HEI led
PGCE and PGDE
Also options to train in Early Years EYTS
School Led Routes
Teach First
School Direct (salaried)
School Direct (non-salaried)
HMC Teacher Training (2 year Independent private schools) leads to PGCE and QTS
School Centred IIT (SCITT)
Apprenticeships
Specialist Routes
Researchers into Schools (PhDs)
Assessment Only – must have good experience
Now Teach – London only – career changers – runs like Teach First – early stage
For HEI and School Direct routes apart from Teach First, you need to apply through UCAS

Applications will open 26th October 2017

https://www.ucas.com/ucas/teacher-training/ucas-teacher-training-apply-and-track

Bursaries available for training

To encourage applications from some shortage subjects bursaries have been in place since 2011. The large bursaries given for some subjects means for example that a student wanting to teach a shortage subject with a First Class Honours could be better off doing a School direct – non salaried and taking the bursary than doing a Schools Direct – salaried. So it’s very important to take into account the subject you are wanting to teach and the bursaries offered for different degree classifications.

The NCTL has announced details of the bursaries which will be available to trainees on postgraduate teacher training courses beginning their training in autumn 2018. For shortage subjects you could earn up to £28,000 whilst training for your PGCE! Check out https://getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/funding-and-salary/overview for further information.

To receive a bursary or scholarship trainees must be entitled to support under the Student Finance England criteria.

Early Years Teaching Status (EYTS)

An EYTS course covers 3month to 5 year olds. The curriculum will have more emphasis than the primary route on social, health care, child psychology and child development of this age group. It is important to note that EYTS status does not have Qualified Teach Status (QTS). However, it is structured around a PGCE course and you must be prepared to work across all age groups. You wont be able to get any funding if already have the EYPS. Graduates holding an EYTS can teach in a reception class setting.

Various routes within EYTS

PGCE birth to 5 Graduate EYTS £7,000 paid towards fees. A full time pathway
Professional certificate – part time work based. Bursary of £14,000 - £7K towards fees and £7K to employer
Assessment only pathway for more experienced practitioners. Will gain experience across the age groups. Assessment covers 5 days in Key Stage 1 and 5 days in key Stage 2. Assessment period altogether is 12 weeks and included a portfolio.
Many graduates go on to work in various locations including Disney – cruise ships, family centres, nurseries, and hospitals.

Primary PGCE

This route is again a university-led postgraduate teaching programme. Information can be found here. So I thought it would be useful to focus on what skills do you need for teaching in a primary school?

The main challenge teaching in a primary school is that you need to be an expert in all 11 areas of the curriculum. Universities offering Primary PGCE will normally offer seminars in all the different areas Maths, English, PE to get you up to speed. You will also need a good deal of resilience because teaching is hard, but the real X Factor of teaching is the need to be able to get along with children and establish a rapport. So, if you have some good experience of working with children then this will help you with an interview for this course. One additional point to mention is that modern languages have to be taught in primary schools now so it’s a real advantage if you have another language!

Other Useful information about this route!

9 month course with 5-11 age group pathway or 3-7 pathway. Both pathways lead to QTS.

Generally those on the course are 50% new grads and 50% previous career or sometimes women returners.

There are normally three large periods of school based work experience – 6 weeks,7 weeks, and then 8 weeks across all age ranges. You will also study pedagogy which is based on years of research.

The course includes 3 Masters level components leading to 60 credits and you can often complete the Masters at a later date.  It’s worth doing this as the Masters is becoming an important step forward if you want to be considered for promotion.

Working in Special Schools

The normal route is to do a PGCE and then specialise afterwards and do a Masters. Some courses will offer an option to specialise on your course. For example:

Perry Knight from the University of Bedfordshire who offer Early Years Teaching Status advises that those wishing to work in special schools or as an SENCO teacher can do one week in a specialist school on placement and if successful offered a full placement in that area. The student would then go on to do the Masters in Special Educational Needs.

PGCE Secondary School

There are many providers offering the PGCE Secondary and this is probably the best known route and a university-led postgraduate teaching programme. All applications are through UCAS.  Further information can be found on the link above on primary.   A key piece of advice here is to make sure you check out the teaching experience you will get on your selected course. For example, Nigel Fancourt – Acting Director PGCE Course Oxford works only with non-selected schools and not even grammar schools as he feels that students needs a wide experience of different schools.

There is still a shortage of teachers in secondary education particularly in Physics and Chemistry. However, Biology remains oversubscribed.

If you are a Psychology graduate and interested in teaching, then its important to demonstrate enough knowledge of chemistry and maths/stats to get in. Again, those graduating in Engineering may be able to gain a place on a PGCE course if enough Maths can be demonstrated

As in the PGCE primary, the pedagogy taught is key in drawing on wider context and research. 60 Credits are also gained towards a Masters which Fancourt stressed was needed for leadership positions. Its worth noting that for the future research informed practice is likely to be the main model  and possibly a 2 year teacher training postgraduate course incorporating a Masters

Latest News! Postgraduate Teacher Apprenticeships

The DfE announced last Thursday a new post-graduate apprenticeship route into teaching.  The post-graduate teaching apprenticeship is a school-led initial teacher training (ITT) route, enabling schools to use their apprenticeship levy to support the training of new teachers.

Entry requirements are the same as for existing PG ITT routes.  The apprenticeship combines work with on and off the job training and on successful completion, apprentice teachers will be awarded Qualified Teacher Status.  Apprentices will be paid at the rates applicable to unqualified teachers.  Schools may receive further financial support from the government for apprenticeships in the shortage subjects and also to a lesser extent for general  primary. This route is available for candidates starting their apprenticeship in 2018.  Applicants will apply for school-led places listed on UCAS and potentially convert their place to an apprenticeship at a later date. For further information click here.

Tomorrow’s blog will look at PGCE (FE), Teach First, SCITT and resources and support for potential teachers with a disability.

 

 

So you want to work with Robots....

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📥  Advice, Career Choice, Commercial Awareness, Finding a Job, For PhDs, For Taught Postgraduates, inspire, Subject Related Careers, Tips & Hints

Earlier this year, I read this article on the Guardian which in a nutshell suggested, Robots will be our bosses in the future. As machine learning improves, the robotics sector is booming and who knows what the possibilities are. According to Recruitment buzz, there has been a five fold increase in the number of jobs in AI. Currently, there are more than double the number of jobs than applicants – with companies fighting to grab the best talent. In fact the job market in the next 10-15 years will be totally different with job titles that are yet to be born.

According to Robert Hillard, managing partner at Deloitte, future work will fall in one of three categories:

  1. People who work for machines such as drivers, online store pickers and some health professionals who are working to a schedule.
  2. People who work with machines such as surgeons using machines to help with diagnosis.
  3. People who work on the machines, such as programmers and designers

AI/Robotics is an evolving field and is still organic in its development. Therefore the market hasn't created a set career path or indeed  established entry requirements. However if you wish to work as a programmer or designer within robotics, it may be worth considering postgraduate study. Graduate schemes with companies like Microsoft, where you can pursue a technical pathway may enable you to move internally into their Robotics department. Recently the Guardian hosted a Q&A about starting a career in robotics, the tips below are worth considering:

  1. Motivation is key to getting your foot through the door. Upskill your coding skills – consider doing a MOOC (Coursera, Udemy, O’Reillys Safari and Kaggle are useful starting points).
  2. Ensure you are building a solid background in C/C++
  3. CognitionX provides a useful way to stay on top of developments.
  4. Get involved in Open Source projects, you’ll develop a network and also learn about the latest workflow processes.
  5. Robotics isn’t just about hard-core coding, there are plenty of opportunities working with datasets for example to influence marketing. There will be growth in support roles such as HR as start ups expand.
  6. The field is ‘Industry-neutral’ – you could work in manufacturing to preventing fraud, to interpreting medical devises to pricing up insurance. Almost every company will have an interest in AI / Robotics.
  7. Don’t expect a straight forward career path, this is a field that is evolving all the time.

Companies leading in Robotics /AI:

  •  Amazon – there are lots of opportunities  in technical as well as business / support roles.
  • Social media companies such as Facebook and Twitter offer interesting graduate schemes in data analytics and in development based roles.
  • You’ve all heard of Elon Musk founder of Tesla, Space X and OpenAI. Worth looking at graduate jobs with them.
  • Other experts in the field include Google (DeepMind), Universal Robotics (Denmark) and Element AI (Canada)
  • Finally, this article from Business Insider lists 10 British AI companies to look out for. It’s worth noting lots of opportunities within Start-ups and also the wide range of fields AI / Robotics touch upon.

Now, like me if you watched the Terminator films, you'd quite rightly have concerns about 'this' super-intelligence escaping human control and Skynet becoming a reality...... ah well, this is a blog post for another day.....

 

The Employers Are Coming – Get Prepared for The Careers Fair!

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📥  Advice, Career Choice, Careers Fairs, Finding a Job, Graduate Jobs, Tips & Hints

The Employers Are Coming – Get Prepared for The Careers Fair!


On Thursday and Friday 19th and 20th October the employers are coming to campus! We will have around 200 employers over the two days from a range of different sectors. This is a unique opportunity for Bath graduates, undergraduates and postgraduates of any year to meet a range of employers in one venue, and will give you the chance to ask questions and assess the types of jobs on offer in an informal setting. Remember this is not just for graduate roles, there are also employers offering summer internships and placements.

The 2017 fair will be held from 11am to 4pm both days, and will be at the Sports Training Village (Netball Courts).

So how do you prepare for the careers fair? Well here are few tips for you:

 

  • Research the employers coming to the fair. The leaflet is out and you can download it from our website.  There are employers from a range of sectors within business and engineering, but we also have charities and public sector represented by organisations such as Cancer Research UK, Department of Education, Welsh Government, Frontline and Teach First. A lot of commercial companies also recruit students from all disciplines so there is something here for anyone, whatever your degree.
  • Plan your visit! Which employers do you want to see and where are they? Make sure to target the employers and find out where they are by checking the Careers Fair map.
  • Prepare questions for the employers you are interested in. The answers may make you decide on what career pathways are best for you or may inspire you to apply for a summer internship or a graduate role. Questions may cover a range of subjects. Maybe you are curious about the day to day work activities, the culture of the workplace? Or maybe you would like to know what type of skills or experiences they are looking for so that you can tailor your job application or prepare for a future interview? Maybe you want to learn more about the industry or the sector, the current issues or developments?  Have a think about what you would like to know and prepare your questions beforehand. Avoid asking the companies what they do, researching the companies or organisations beforehand should help you with that! More ideas for questions to ask can be found here.
  • Wear something nice. No need to wear a suit or business attire, but avoid looking scruffy or avoid looking like you have just just come from the gym. First impressions counts, even at a careers fair.
  • Prepare your CV. You never know when an opportunity arises to give an employer your CV. If you would like some feedback on your CV, have a look at our excellent CV guide and come to one of our quick query appointments to have it looked over. You can book these appointments through MyFuture.

Finally, just be yourself and enjoy the day. We hope that you will come out of the fair with ideas, inspiration and knowledge that you can use further in  your career.

For more information, see our website for more details or on how to prepare for the Careers Fair, have a look at our Careers Fair Guide.

 

 

 

 

Careers in the Civil Service

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📥  Advice, Career Choice, Careers Resources, Commercial Awareness, Finding a Job, Graduate Jobs, Internships, Sector Insight

Careers in the Civil Service


This blog post was originally posted by Sue Briault, but has been updated to include current information and links. For up to date news and information about Civil Service Fast Stream and for the chance of interacting with current fast streamers, make sure to like Civil Service Fast Stream Careers on Facebook


About the Civil Service

The Civil Service does the practical and administrative work of government. More than half of all civil servants provide services direct to the public. If you want to know more about the Civil Service and it's purpose then go here. If you are interested in the work of the more than 60 government departments and over 100 agencies then these can easily be found on the GOV UK website where every department and agency has a space.

Jobs within the Civil Service can range from administrative positions within departments to embassy posts with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO).  There are also a number of professions employed within the Civil Service including economists, statisticians and scientists . Staff may work anywhere in the United Kingdom and possibly overseas, although the majority involved in policy work are located in London. There are increasing numbers of opportunities within the devolved regions and some departments are based in locations such as Bristol, Leeds, Sheffield, Newcastle, Edinburgh and Cardiff.

When applying to jobs in the civil service it is important to research the Civil Service competencies, which sets out how the Civil Service want people to work. Research the competencies and write down examples from your academic background, work experiences and/or extra-curricular activities to see how they compare and fit with each competency.

Civil Service Fast Stream

This is the accelerated development programme for graduates. Applications opened in September and will close in October 2017, so if you are interested, apply now! This includes entry into the Diplomatic Service. It is also possible to apply to the Civil Service Fast Stream even though you are working within the Civil Service.  There are several different Fast Streams and you can find more information about the schemes on the Fast Stream website.

  • Analytical Options (AFS):

Government Economic Service (GES)
Government Operational Research Service (GORS)
Government Statistical Service (GSS)
Government Social Research Service (GSR)

  • Other Options:

Generalist
Human Resources
Diplomatic Service
Diplomatic Economic Scheme
Houses of Parliament
Science and Engineering (only open to postgraduates)
Commercial
Finance
Government Communication Service
Project Delivery
Digital, Data and Technology
Other Civil Service Graduate Schemes

Other Graduate Schemes

Graduate schemes run by individual departments can be hard to find out about so keeping an eye on the Civil Service Jobs website is important as not all have dedicated webpages available to see year round (see  section below).

It is also worth noting that many Civil Service graduate schemes make offers of jobs at the grade below to ‘near misses’. This happens in the Fast Stream too. Those that scored only a few points below the overall benchmark may be made an offer or an interview for a role at Executive Officer grade (the grade below the one Fast Streamers start on). This isn’t always well publicised because employers don’t want to raise candidate expectations but it is worth being aware that applications to the Fast Stream or other Graduate Scheme can be a good entry point into the Civil Service.

Other services who recruit graduates include MI5, MI6 and GCHQ.

Other Civil Service Jobs

The place to look for all Civil Service vacancies is https://www.civilservicejobs.service.gov.uk. Create an account and you can then set up some preferences and then receive regular job updates by email. You will need to click "Show more" to be able to select Job Grade as a preference. Why should you look here? Because there are many jobs that would be suitable for graduates within the Civil Service that are not part of the Fast Stream or other Graduate Schemes.

Frequently spotted on Civil Service Jobs :

HMRC Social Researchers
Temporary Statistical Officers
Temporary Assistant Economists
Various individual Scientist Posts suitable for both undergraduates and postgraduates
Graduate Internships at Executive Officer level

Work Experience

There are two schemes available:

You will find that placements are available through your placement office in some government departments and others may be advertised through the Civil Service Jobs website mentioned previously. There is not a strong expectation that you will have gained experience within the Civil Service before applying for a graduate job there. Think about the competencies that they recruit against and develop your experience to demonstrate these.

Nationality Requirements

There is strict criteria regarding nationality for entry to the Civil Service and comprehensive guidelines are available here. Any job in the Civil Service is open to applicants who are UK nationals or have dual nationality (with one being British). About 75% of Civil Service posts are also open to Commonwealth citizens and nationals of any of the member states of the European Economic Area (EEA), although at some point this latter group will have their status changed once the UK's exit from the EU is settled. I am advised that the Civil Service is not a Tier 2 sponsor.

 

Every company needs a Data Scientist...

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📥  Career Choice, Careers Fairs, Graduate Jobs, inspire, Labour Market Intelligence

What if there was one skill you could acquire that would help you secure a job in any industry?
That skill set is: Data Science.

 

In a report published by IBM this year, demand for Data Scientists will soar by 28% in 2020. Key take aways from the report were:

  • 59% of all Data Science and Analytics (DSA) job demand is in Finance and Insurance, Professional Services, and IT.
  • By 2020 the number of Data Science and Analytics job vacancies are projected to grow to approximately 2,720,000.
  • Machine learning, big data, and data science skills are the most challenging to recruit for.

Think of the sheer amount of data available to organisations and individuals today. As a result, we are no longer able to rely on humans to derive any meaningful insights. Instead we are relying on algorithms which has given birth to the term machine learning. The field of Data Science is bit of a moving target, with new jobs emerging daily - however below are the key roles you may wish to consider:

  • Data Scientist / Engineer: I think this is one of those all encompassing titles. Every organisation can potentially benefit from someone who can analyse past performance of their business to predict future opportunities. The 'Data Scientist' role is more generalist and could be the first step into this field of work. You will need to be confident with stats and have the ability to communicate complex information in an accessible way.
  • Business Intelligence (BI) Analyst: According to Microsoft, BI is all about simplifying data so that it can easily be used by  decision makers within a business. This is a technology driven position, with few entry level roles.
  • Machine Learning Specialist: Machine Learning is a method of teaching computers to make and improve behaviours and predictions based on use of data. As an individual you'll need excellent attention to detail and the ability to think creatively.
  • Data Visualisation Specialist: this is an industry neutral role enabling you to work in any sector or business. The primary job is to creatively and appropriately visualise and present complex data. You'll need strong programming skills and knowledge of databases. This is a highly creative role.
  • Business Analytics Specialist: a role requiring you to be business and tech savvy! This is more of a project management role where you work with technical teams to implement projects internally or for your clients.

So, inspired to find out more? Why not come along to our Careers Fair on 19-20 October, over 200 employers will be on campus. You can use this opportunity to learn about how they are approaching the big data conundrum and the opportunities available to you once you graduate.

 

 

Graduate skills in the world of the future

📥  Advice, Career Choice, Career Development, Careers Resources, inspire, Labour Market Intelligence, Sector Insight

Hardly a day goes by without a news report on robots either taking over our jobs or revolutionising our lives. I recently attended The World of Work Conference at Henley Business School where the message was loud and clear: THE ROBOTS ARE COMING and we all need to adapt and ready ourselves for this new world of work.

It is inevitable, technology gives birth new career paths and along the way some jobs disappear as machines can do them faster. According to the BBC, approximately 35% of current jobs in the UK are at risk. Nesta have put together a handy quiz which assesses the probability of a robot taking over your job. While Transport for London is embroiled in a row with Uber, driverless cars pose a threat to the whole industry (ok..I'm saying this for dramatic effect).

Truth is technological innovation has given birth to new industries. In May this year, the Tech Trends Report, now in its 10th year, provided a fascinating insight into emerging technologies that are on a growth trajectory. They identified 150 trends across a wide range of sectors from Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Bitcoin to Genomics. The one that caught my attention was the development of Invisibility Cloaks. Researchers at Queen Mary - University of London are experimenting with electromagnetic and audio waves, tiny lenses that bend light and reflective materials to hide objects in plain sight.

In a report by Microsoft 65% of school students in university today will take up jobs that don’t exist yet. So what does all this mean in practical terms? If you are embarking on your graduate career, I think it is important to stay focused on sectors and trends with potential for future growth. This awareness will make your career progression easier and potentially offer greater job security. In his book 'What to do when machines do everything' the message is clear - work on developing personal skills such as empathy and creativity (essentially the stuff robots aren't good at - yet). Below are the top 10 skills needed in 2020 (that's round the corner).

Over the next few weeks we are going to blog about careers in emerging industries such as Big Data, Synthetic Biology, Robotics and Regenerative Medicine. So stay tuned....!

 

Opportunities in Government for scientists and engineers

📥  Advice, Career Choice, Careers Resources, Event, For PhDs, For Taught Postgraduates, inspire, Sector Insight, Subject Related Careers

I went to a fascinating talk a couple of weeks ago, organised by the Bath Institute for Mathematical Innovation,  by the Government Office for Science about career opportunities for scientists and engineers in the Civil Service. Go-Science provides policy advice and support to the Government Chief Scientific Adviser in carrying out his role in advising the Prime Minister and Cabinet on a wide variety of areas including Risk and Resilience, Infrastructure, Trade and Finance, Energy and Climate Change, Cities, and Data and Analytics. The Government Chief Scientific Adviser is also the Head of the Science and Engineering profession for around 10,000 scientist and engineers who work in government in a variety of roles from specialist to policy as part of the Government Science and Engineering (GSE) profession.
This YouTube video provides a useful overview of the Government Science and Engineering Profession.

We heard from three recent science graduates working for Government; as you read their stories you’ll see that they moved around a bit after they graduated, a timely reminder for those uncertain about their next step is that where you start isn’t necessarily where you’ll end up, and our interests and career plans often change and develop over time:

Jenni completed a Masters degree in Meteorology at the University of Reading and worked as a weather forecaster in Singapore for a number of years for oil and gas clients., She then returned to the UK and worked providing forecasts for media and film production companies. During this time she realised that she wanted to work at the science-policy interface within government. Jenni took an intern policy research role (which was fully paid) in the Government Office for Science before achieving a permanent position on promotion to her current role at Cabinet Office.

Alex is part of the Horizon Scanning Team, Government Office for Science. Her role involves advising government on the evidence and scientific basis for new technologies. Alex did a Biology degree and then a Masters in Marine Science. While working in a wildlife conservation start-up she became interested in technology, and saw an advert for an internship with the Government Office for Science; her paid internship was initially for six months, and following a successful review her contract has been extended for a further six months. Alex enjoys using her scientific knowledge to in way that has real world impact.

Jerome is currently doing the Science and Engineering Fast Stream. He did an undergraduate degree which included a year in industry and then a PhD in theoretical structural Biology. He realised during his PhD that he wanted to do science that was more applied and had more impact. His first role was working for the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, where he was part of the research funding team, managing funding calls, visiting universities and working on Equality and Diversity policy. He realised that he wanted a career that made use of his intellectual capacities, and considered working for think tanks and consultancies before settling on the Civil Service. His current role involves writing briefings and speeches for ministers, and he has liaised with a wide range of groups including academic, the NHS and patients, and frequently gets to meet with very senior people in external organisations.

Some general insights and tips from the three graduates on working as scientists in the Civil Service:
- Roles can involve researching areas of science and technology that the government wants more information on – not necessarily from your own specialism.
- The analytical skills gained as part of your science degree can be put to good use outside of the lab in a range of jobs from understanding research reports, to commissioning new work.
- They were not expected to have particular areas of technical expertise, but rather to be have a broad knowledge, scientific training and interest in science and engineering which enables them to get to grips with new areas quickly.
- There are roles that do require particular technical skills and enable the development of specialist science and engineering careers in many organisations of the public sector such as Safety, Security, Defence (both military and civilian), Public Health, the Met Office and many, many, more- the role of Government scientist and engineers, as with all civil servants, is to support the priorities set by the Government of the day.
- Roles are varied and include real responsibility from the outset supported by induction, training, and development opportunities.
- To stay in touch with opportunities follow the GSE Blog: https://governmentscienceandengineering.blog.gov.uk/

Getting in to science policy
If you have a particular interest on working on science to inform policy or indeed the policy of science there are opportunities in the Civil Service, and scientific learned societies (e.g. Royal Society, Institute of Physics). Some entry level roles may requires a Masters or PhD. (https://wellcome.ac.uk/jobs/graduate-development-programme) has a graduate scheme. This article by Queen Mary, University of London Careers Service has a useful summary of organisations work in science policy and relevant events and training courses. If you’re wanting to get into science policy, think about getting some short-term experience (internships are sometimes advertised on the Campaign for Science and Engineering website, and there are internships for Research-Council funded PhD students to work in a range of policy organisations), keep up to date with scientific issues that affect public policy, and build your networks through sites like LinkedIn and our own Bath Connection.

For other ideas for non lab-based career options for scientists, take a look at our guide to Alternative Careers in Science.

 

Graduate Fair Blog Series: Careers in the IT and Technology Sector

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📥  Advice, Career Choice, Careers Fairs, Careers Resources, Graduate Jobs, Subject Related Careers, Tips & Hints

 

Pictures circling around Pacific Islander woman's head

This blog entry is a part of the Graduate Fair Blog Series introducing sectors and industries which will be present at the University of Bath Graduate Fair, Tuesday 25th April. Please go here for more information about the fair and the employers present.


The Sector

The IT & technology sector is thriving as never before. Employers are desperate for high-skilled graduates, often from any discipline, as the demand for skilled workers do not match the amount of work available. Meanwhile, the Experis Tech Cities Job Watch report for the second quarter of 2016 notes that the skills shortage covers five main disciplines: IT security, cloud computing, mobile, big data and web development. Even though a degree in Computer Science will be an advantage and some jobs do require a degree, some organisations will have a preference for those who studied a STEM subject (that is, science, maths, technology or engineering). Other jobs require only an interest and understanding of IT and technology and you will learn the necessary skills on the job. Problem-solving, being good at collaboration with colleagues and communication are key skills needed.

The Careers

With an interest in IT and technology or a computer science degree you have a wealth of different careers on your fingertips. With an additional interest in business and technology, you may thrive as a consultant or work as an analyst in the financial industry. On the other hand, maybe you will thrive more as a games developer or a web developer? There are also many jobs where a computer science degree or an understanding of IT and technology is useful, such as becoming a teacher or a social media manager.

Look at Prospects for a closer look on different job roles within IT & Technology.

The Employers

Common employers are IT consultancies or IT providers but you can get jobs in pretty much all sectors including healthcare, defence, agriculture, public sector and more, as everywhere needs an IT and technology specialist. There are many opportunities in major companies and SMEs (smaller to medium enterprises), however be aware that there are also many start up tech companies which may require your skills.


There are  several employers at out Graduate Fair with roles within IT and technology, some require a computer science or STEM degree, others are looking for students from any degree disciplines, please check the programme which will be available from early April. Employers include: Sword Apak, Data Interconnect, Bath Spa University, Office for National Statistics, Global Kubrick Group, Rise Technical Recruitment, Global, Thought Provoking Consulting, The Phoenix Partnership and more. Check here for further information about these employers.


Getting work experience and qualifications in these areas - whether it be learning specific programming languages or doing a summer internship or placement - will put you in prime position to start you career in the sector.

Interested to read more?

If you are still interested here are some good articles for you to learn more:

The benefits of working in information technology

Getting a graduate job in IT and technology - the basics

Overview of the IT sector in the UK