Careers Perspectives – from the Bath careers service

Focus on your future with expert advice from your careers advisers

Tagged: disability

Update on Careers Provision for Students with Disabilities

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📥  Advice, Diversity, Uncategorized

As many of you are probably aware the Careers Service has now moved down to the Virgil Building in Manvers Street and we are now open!   So, I thought now would be a very good time to talk about the provision that we offer to all of our disabled students – so this would cover anyone with physical, mental health and learning needs such as dyslexia and dyspraxia. To make sense of our provision I have split this into General Careers Provision and Additional Careers Provision for Disabled Students.

Careers photo

 

General Careers Service Provision

You may have already seen your Faculty or Department Careers Adviser who will deliver some Department-specific activities on campus. Some of our employer talks and promotional activities will also still take place on campus.

However, most of our Careers Service activities have now moved down to the Virgil Building in Manvers Street where you can book Quick Queries and can also book longer appointments through our reception down there as well as attend skills workshops. In VB we also have a number of resources and free leaflets and information booklets which you might find useful. So when you are down in Manvers St do pop in to see the facilities! We are located on the 2nd level near the main reception so a lift will shortly be installed at the main entrance.

To book an appointment in VB just go to https://myfuture.bath.ac.uk

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Additional Careers Service Provision for Disabled Students

The University recognises that some students would benefit from having careers support still on campus. So in addition to all of the above, my new role as a Careers Adviser is to provide exactly this on campus and I am here to support you during your time with us and in the year after you graduate to ensure that you reach the career goals that you are looking for. So what exactly does that mean?

Appointments on campus

I am based on campus for three days a week and therefore I am able to offer you appointments here. You can either phone our reception to book one of the slots on a Tuesday or Wednesday by ringing 01225 386009 (just let our enquiry team know that you are a disabled student), or you can email me (Melanie Wortham) and I can book these for you. If you are unable to make those times, then I have some flexibility on Mondays to offer you alternative appointments. So basically, we are offering you additional careers provision which will hopefully be useful in busy semesters. In vacations you will also have the support of a careers adviser, and can access appointments remotely by Skype or telephone if you prefer.

 

So why would you come and see me?!

If you just have a short query such as how to explain something on your CV, or wanted to know something about a particular occupation, then book a 15 minute appointment – that is perfectly fine. Or it may be that you are not sure of what you want to do and a 45 minute appointment may be more appropriate.

Here are 10 reasons students’ book to see a Careers Adviser:-

Get advice on their CV and applications
No idea or little idea on what you might like to do in the future
Get some ideas on work experience, and where to look
Discuss placements, internships, voluntary work
Need some help with interviews – we offer practice interviews
Job search
Looking to go into something completely out of the degree area and need advice
Being a mature student and looking for a career change
Considering Further Study
Advice on psychometric tests and assessment centres

I hope the above has given you some idea on the sorts of help and advice that we offer. However, if there are any other careers related issues you would like to discuss, then please just email me and come and chat about it! I very much look forward to meeting some of you over the coming months and years.

 

China Disability Scholarship!

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📥  Diversity, Internships, Work Experience

Applications for the 2016 CRCC Asia and the British Council China Disability Scholarship are now open.


Now running for a fourth year, the scholarship was established in January 2013 to offer students with a disability the opportunity to participate in CRCC Asia’s award-winning China Internship Program. With the support of the British Council in China, CRCC Asia is able to offer two fully-funded places on the 2016 China Disability Scholarship, one in Beijing and one in Shanghai.
The Disability Scholarship Program is run in conjunction with the British Council in China and is specifically designed for academically excellent students with a disability. The successful candidates will undertake a two month internship working with the British Council in Beijing or Shanghai in summer 2016. The interns will live in the centre of each city, gaining transferable business skills and hands-on experience whilst working in an international setting. They will also benefit from CRCC Asia’s full social program with cultural activities, Chinese language classes, and professional networking events. Upon completion of the program, the students will be able to boost their CVs with their international internship experience, stand out from the crowd and prepare for their career ahead.

The recipients of the 2015 Disability Scholarship were Laura Gillhespy (Beijing) and Jasmine Rahman (Shanghai), graduates of the University of York and Durham University respectively. Both Laura and Jasmine recorded their time in China through weekly blogs. Since completing their internships, both Laura and Jasmine have returned to China to pursue their careers. To find out how they got on, you can read Laura’s blog here and Jasmine’s blog here.

Application deadline is 1st April 2016. 

 

Asking for reasonable adjustments...

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📥  Diversity

GUEST BLOG: Blind in Business is a charity set up to support students and graduates who are blind or have partial sight into employment  Jessica Luke is their Graduate Coordinator and has shared her personal insights as a visually impaired job hunter along with practical tips on requesting reasonable adjustments at work. Blind in Business will also be delivering a talk on campus in Semester 2, details will be available on MyFuture nearer the time. For more information about Blind in Business, please visit their website.

Blind In Business

As a visually impaired graduate and job-hunter, I wasn’t really sure what to expect from employers during the recruitment process. I’d heard of the term reasonable adjustments, but I didn’t really know what this meant in practice.  Google says that reasonable adjustments are changes that employers make to enable disabled workers to work without being at a disadvantage to others. But it’s hard to know which adjustments are reasonable in the eyes of an employer and how willing an employer will be to make changes when they could just employ someone else.

From my experience of the graduate recruitment process, a majority of employers were prepared to allow alterations to the process that enabled me to perform equally with other candidates.

I asked for extra time in psychometric tests and for mobility support at my assessment centre and I was allowed to use my laptop instead of a flipchart during an assessed presentation. As long as I could justify the need for support, graduate employers were willing to help.

Here are a few things that are worth knowing about reasonable adjustments:

1.     Don’t be afraid to ask for adaptations that allow you be assessed equally with other candidates.

While it’s essential to present a can-do attitude to a potential employer, it is better to be honest about what help you need. Disclosing a disability can be worrying, but I would advise it, if you are applying for graduate schemes.

2.     Don’t make out that you cannot do things that you can.

Maybe maths is not your forte and you would prefer to avoid a numerical reasoning test or perhaps the idea public speaking is terrifying and you think that your disability could help you to avoid being asked to present. Employers today, particularly graduate employers, are increasingly aware of disability requirements. They will have an idea of what is and isn’t possible for a disabled applicant and it will reflect badly on you to opt out of tasks that you are capable of doing.

3.     You may have to chase employers to put reasonable adjustments in place.

I would normally advise graduates never to hassle HR staff about the progress of an application. This said, when places are given out on a rolling basis, waiting to for adjustments to your psychometric tests can mean that places on your chosen scheme will be taken before you have a chance to get through the process. I work for the charity Blind in Business, which helps sight impaired graduates to get good graduate scheme jobs. We are happy to advocate on a candidates behalf to arrange extra time or a scribe for recruitment tests.

4.     Speak up, if you are not given the adaptations that you need.

I sat many psychometric tests when applying to different graduate schemes and on one occasion I felt that I was at a disadvantage because of the test structure. I receive extra time in numerical reasoning tests because my restricted field of vision means that it takes longer to find the relevant information from graphs and charts. I found that with extra time, although I was often timed out before completing the last couple of questions on a test, I was able to answer enough questions correctly to pass. This particular test had a time limit for each question. This meant that I was repeatedly timed out. I wrote an email to HR explaining that I couldn’t read the graphs and charts quickly enough when there was a per-question time limit and the recruiter arranged for me to re-sit the tests with a global time limit instead. This option is now given as standard to visually impaired people who apply to this employer.

The government scheme Access to Work is there to help provide any equipment or support that you need in the workplace. For information on the scheme, visit: https://www.gov.uk/access-to-work/overview

Diversity is important to make an organisation thrive and employers are more open to recruiting disabled graduates than in the past.

If I had one piece of advice to give, I would say to remember that employers may not have first-hand experience of working with someone with your disability. So put them at ease. Show them how small adaptations allow you to do a great job. If you present them with access solutions and a can-do approach, you are much more likely to get the job.

 

How to interview well when discussing a disability

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📥  Advice, Diversity

GUEST BLOG: City Disabilities is a charity set up to provide support and advice for students and professionals with disabilities, as well as employers. Liz Dawes has very kindly written a guest blog post which contains excellent advice on how you discuss your disability at an interview.

For more information about City Disabilities and how they can support you and details of their excellent mentoring programme, please visit their website.

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There is no legal obligation to disclose a disability at interview, and many people choose not to. For people whose disability is either obvious, or affects how they do their job, this choice is not available. That being the case, how do you discuss a disability at interview in a positive way, ensuring you are fairly assessed?

Focus on the job
Job adverts come with a person specification. The purpose of an interview is to discover if you fulfil that specification. Like any other candidate, concentrate on showing, through your answers, that you meet the person spec as advertised. If you don’t show how you fulfil the person spec, you won’t be offered the job.

How does your disability impact your work?
If you are going to discuss a disability, keep it in the context of how you will do your job. If you are asked about skills you have that are impacted by your disability, explain this in your reply. So to use a simple example, let’s imagine a person has some hearing loss, and the person spec requires them to use the telephone frequently. When asked about those skills, a candidate can say: “Because I have partial hearing loss, it can be difficult for me to hear conversations over the telephone.” They can then go on to explain what practical solutions will work best for them.

What solutions work for you?
Think through the ways an employer can offer you reasonable adjustments at work, and explain this to them once you have raised your disability. Demonstrate that you have thought through what you need to do at work, and have found solutions to any issues. Consider advances in technology, practical matters of access, and the kind of support you might need. If an employer can see how adjustments can be made, they are more likely to consider you as a candidate. You will also be demonstrating that you are proactive, understand the job requirements, and have a practical approach.

No headlines
Try not to highlight disability as a big deal if you don’t need to. Put it into the context of the job you are being asked to do, and show how it is a practical issue that can be dealt with. There is no need to give the impression that it is an issue, when it isn’t. Ask yourself: What part of the job does your disability affect, how does it affect it, and how do you propose to overcome this issue? This approach reassures an employer that you have thought about the job, thought about the person spec, are clear how you can fulfil the spec and so do the job, and will be a reliable employee.

Accentuate the positive
Employers often ask questions designed to show a candidates resilience, resourcefulness and dedication. Remember that candidates with disabilities have very often faced more hurdles and shown more determination that non-disabled candidates. Do not be afraid of pointing out the issues you have dealt with while still achieving the academic and personal success that has got you to the interview stage.

Beware of inappropriate reactions
Unfortunately some employers are not as good as they should be on these matters. If you encounter a negative reaction to your discussions, think carefully about the employer. If they see disability as a big issue you may find them hard to work for. That’s not to say that you shouldn’t work there, but if you do not believe the culture of an employer is the best for you, then you may not be happy.

 

Careers support for disabled students

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📥  Advice, Diversity

The careers team are mindful this is a really hectic time for a lot of you - some of you may be considering placements, applying for graduate jobs where as some of you may be trying to clarify your thinking about what you want to do. All this can sometimes feel really overwhelming... and more so if you have additional needs arising from disabilities and health conditions. You may be worrying about whether you disclose your disability and how employers may view this in the selection process.

Please let me assure you - there are lots of good, inclusive employers out there who will take on board individual circumstances, and will view your disability positively. My role in the careers service is to support you and I can help you in a number of ways such as:

  • discussing when to disclose
  • clarifying reasonable adjustments and helping you to explain these to potential employers
  • helping you to identify inclusive employers

To book an appointment  please contact the Careers Service or email me, Saiyada Fazal, directly at s.fazal@bath.ac.uk. Our conversation is confidential. Do also keep an eye on our events programme; for example next Wednesday, 28th October, City Disabilities will be delivering a webinar on disclosing your disability from 1.15-2.05pm. We also blog useful advice and opportunities so keep checking back.

 

 

Autism in the Workplace...

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📥  Diversity, Sector Insight

This recent article in The Guardian highlights the work of Specialisterne (Danish for the Specialists) – a charitable organisation which has now spread to 13 countries, including Britain, where for the last two years it has placed people on the spectrum in positions in the BBC, the NHS and Lockheed Martin in Glasgow among others.

If you are a Bath student or graduate who has autism and would like to discuss your disability and how to present it to employers, please book an appointment with one of our careers advisers. You may also find our blog post on disclosure and advice for disabled students of interest. Remember we are open throughout the summer holidays!

 

DisabledGo provides access guide at Bath!

  

📥  Advice, Diversity

 

This morning I have been exploring the DisabledGo routes at Bath. This is a fantastic resource and will I am sure be of huge help to our prospective and current disabled students.  DisabeledGo provides invaluable information about the accessibility of our facilities and route plans around the campus.

Within the Careers Service we are committed to offering an accessible service to all our students, some of the ways we can help are:

  • We can provide handouts in alternative formats and on request can photocopy certain resources on colored paper to support our dyslexic students.
  • Access to a dedicated disability Careers Adviser, Saiyada Fazal who can offer extended careers appointments.
  • Our students are invited to declare their disability when booking a careers event and where possible appropriate arrangements will be put in place to facilitate attendance.

Making our service accessible is an ongoing job so please tell us if you have other ideas on how we can further improve our support.

 

Dyslexia is Richard Branson's greatest business advantage!

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📥  Advice, Diversity

richard-branson-explains-why-he-considers-dyslexia-his-greatest-business-advantage

This morning I came across this article, in which Richard Branson explains why he considers dyslexia his greatest business advantage. He says having dyslexia strengthened his communication skills and credits it with another of his signature management techniques: the habit of always taking notes. He writes in his 2014 book "The Virgin Way" that he learned as a child that if he ever had a chance at remembering anything, he'd need to jot it down. To this day, he says he carries a notebook everywhere.

He goes on to say, "if you are dyslexic, it is important that you do not allow yourself to feel inferior just because you can't spell every word in the dictionary. Vary your activities and interests so that you can uncover your strengths". According to the NHS, approximately 10% of the British population has dyslexia, to some extent, making it one of the most common learning difficulties. Yet students and graduates with dyslexia often worry about informing potential employers of their condition. In a blog post a few months ago, we talked about how you can harness dyslexia to give you an advantage when job hunting.

If you would like to discuss the pros and cons of disclosing dyslexia to potential employers or would like help with any aspect of job hunting, please book a quick query and chat to one of our expert careers advisers.

 

Diversity Round Up!

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📥  Advice, Diversity, Graduate Jobs, Internships

I wanted to share some upcoming deadlines that may be of interest to some of our students:

Women in Investment Banking: offers 50 career motivated first year female students a unique opportunity to hear first-hand what it is like to work in an investment bank and how you can follow in their footsteps!

The Met Diversity Internship: This summer, the Met are recruiting up to 19 talented interns for a paid internship, to work on projects that could change the future of policing.

IT: its not just for boys: Event designed exclusively for female students who are looking to find out more about technology careers.

National Audit Office Scholarship Programme for BAME students: Summer Internship Programme for undergraduates
from a Black or Asian minority ethnic background who are interested in a career in accounting and auditing.

The Mike Devenney Scholarship for Disabled Students: The Mike Devenney Scholarship helps talented and independent minded disabled students, both undergraduate and postgraduate with some of the costs of studying at higher education institutions.

 

Job hunting tips for students and graduates with Aspergers

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📥  Diversity, Tips & Hints

Finding employment after graduating can be difficult for many students. However, for graduates with Aspergers Syndrome, this process can be particularly challenging. Aspergers is hidden disability affecting around 700,000 people in the UK. The condition manifests itself in different ways but more commonly it can affect communication and social skills. This can prove to be a significant barrier at interviews and assessment centres which often form part of the recruitment process.

If you are a student or graduate with Aspergers and find interviews and assessment centres particularly challenging, you may want to consider the following advice:

  • Disclose your disability: whether you disclose is a significant concern for many students and graduates. You can choose to disclose at any stage of the application process. However disclosing and discussing any adjustments prior to interview may enable you to showcase your true potential.
  • Discuss your disability positively: Once you have disclosed be open and talk about your disability positively. Think about the skills and positive attributes you have developed as a result of having a disability and draw on this evidence in the interview to showcase your suitability for the role.
  • Articulate your needs: by knowing what adjustments you need you can be proactive in requesting the right support. The Great with Disability website has examples of the types of adjustments you can request.
  • Get interview practice: interviews and assessment centres take practice and it can help to understand what employers are looking for. Do contact us in the careers service for 1:1 practice, we are able to help you even if you have graduated.
  • Is this right for you: if you find you are locked in a cycle of not getting interviews or being unsuccessful in assessment centres, then do step back and consider whether this role or industry is the best fit for you? You may want to think about your strengths and explore where you could make a strong contribution. I thought the advice shared by Chris Carson is excellent and really worth considering.

The  National Autistic Society have a wealth of information on their website. You may also want to explore opportunities advertised via Remploy, Even Break and EmployAbility. Finally, if you are a Bath student or graduate please contact Saiyada Fazal, our careers adviser who takes lead in supporting disabled students.