Bath 6th Annual HPC Symposium - 12th June 2017

Posted in: High Performance Computing (HPC), Research

We are looking forward to the 6th Annual Symposium on High Performance Computing (HPC) in just a few days time, on Monday, 12th June 2017, over in the Chancellors' Building.

We have had 63 registrations from staff and students across the University. There is an exciting programme lined up with two fantastic keynotes from Prof Simon McIntosh-Smith and Prof David Britton, 9 contributed talks and an active set of quick fire flash poster/talks to look forward to. This will be an excellent opportunity to get an overview of the broad research being done by our growing HPC community here at Bath, and to discuss your own work with others and exchange ideas.

The full schedule is available on the link below and a detailed programme can be found here:
http://www.bath.ac.uk/bucs/services/hpc/symposium/2017/programme/
http://www.bath.ac.uk/bucs/services/hpc/symposium/2017/programme/full-programme.pdf

 

Keynotes speakers:

We are pleased to announce two Keynote speakers for the 6th Annual Symposium on HPC.

The first Keynote will be from Simon McIntosh-Smith, from the University of Bristol, who will give a talk entitled: "Xeon and Pascal and POWER, oh Phi!”: how to cope in a world of increasingly diverse architectures".

Simon is a Professor of High Performance Computing and the Head of the Microelectronics Research Group. Just to mention some of his roles, he is a contributor to both the OpenCL and OpenMP parallel programming standards, regular member of the programme committee for IEEE/ACM SuperComputing and ISC and member of the EPSRC Archer national supercomputer design team.

Simon's research interests include: Performance portability, Application-based fault tolerance (ABFT), New algorithms for novel architectures, Heterogeneous, many-core processor architectures, including GPUs, Xeon Phi, FPGAs, DSPs etc., Scaling applications to run on millions of cores (Exascale computing).
The second Keynote will be from David Britton who is a member of the ATLAS collaboration, one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (https://home.cern/about). He will give a talk entitled: "Evolution of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid".

David is a professor of physics at the University of Glasgow and Project Leader of the GridPP project that provides Grid computing for particle physics throughout the UK. He is a member of the ATLAS collaboration, one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN with an interest in Higgs decaying to a pair of tau-leptons. Previously he worked on CMS, another of the LHC experiments, qualifying the crystals that make up the end-caps of the electromagnetic calorimeter. He has also worked at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (the BaBar experiment); Cornell (the CLEO experiment); and at DESY in Hamburg (the ARGUS experiment) with an emphasis on tracking detectors. Earlier work at TRIUMF in Vancouver established the most stringent limits on lepton universality through rare pion decays.

He has been involved with the GridPP project since conception in 2000 and was one of the lead authors of the proposals for all three phases. Initially appointed as Project Manager, he took over as the GridPP Project leader in 2008. GridPP is a collaboration of Particle Physicists and Computing Scientists from 19 UK Universities together with the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory and CERN, who have built a Grid for Particle Physics.

Posted in: High Performance Computing (HPC), Research

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