Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies

Scientists and engineers working together for a sustainable future

Latest posts

  • Meet Cohort 2018

    In October 2018, 16 new students joined our EPSRC CDT in Sustainable Chemical Technologies. The following post was designed by Matthew Cowley and Calum Hand to introduce the new cohort. Read more about them on our website.  

  • Changing Water

    Caitlin is a third year PhD student working with Dr Jannis Wenk on photocatalysis for wastewater treatment to remove emerging contaminants. In the last week of May, I travelled to China for the International Water Association (IWA) 15th Leading Edge...

  • IOM3 Self-Healing Elastomers Conference

    Jamie is a first year PhD student working with Professor Matthew Davidson and ARTIS on the application of self-healing for rubber seals in the oil and gas industry. What: IOM3 Self-Healing Elastomers Conference Where: Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining, London...

  • 10 ways we made the most of a conference in China

    The following blog is written by Maria Weber and Carlos Lopez. Maria is a final year PhD student in Professor Tony James' group working on diagnostic tools for early cancer detection. Carlos is also a final year PhD student working...

  • The CSCT PhD Himalayman - A Newton-Bhabha Placement (Part 1)

    Touchdown at IIT Mandi As part of my PhD at the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies at the University of Bath, I have been fortunate enough to secure three months of research funding through the Newton-Bhabha fund to visit the...

  • The perks of attending small conferences

    Sure, a conference on the other side of the world with thousands of participants from academia and industry sounds impressive. However, do not underestimate the perks of smaller conferences! In July 2018, I had the opportunity to attend the BBSRC...

  • What I learned about organoids from two recent conferences

    The aim of my PhD is to design a bioreactor to produce miniature tumours (organoids) in large scales for drug testing. Organoids are better than the more conventional 2D models for testing drugs because they closely mimic the 3D structure...