Exploring new ways of writing about our research

Posted in: Beta, Content design, Content Publisher

One of the most common content types we currently use for our research content is a press release. Or a news item, which is what we call them after slightly repurposing them for the website. In the past three months, we’ve published roughly 40 research-related news items.

The thing about press releases is that they are tied quite heavily to two very specific points in the research lifecycle - winning a research grant and publishing a paper. Similarly, case studies, of which we’ve published six in the past three months, are tied to a particular point in the research project - to complete the classic case study structure, the results of the research have to be in.

Softer, narrative content

The new content we’re suggesting moves away from all these time-related restrictions. It places the emphasis away from published papers and research results. The story becomes about the researcher, their journey, personality and aspirations. The style of writing is softer, more narrative.

This is a result of a Digital research content strategy we launched in late 2015. It sets out how we want to develop the way we communicate about our research online to reach new audiences and make most of all the cool research that’s happening at Bath.

We recently published two of these kinds of stories. One of them is about an ambitious Syrian researcher who’s on the brink of finishing his PhD with a promising career ahead of him, potentially in a leading international architecture company. The other one is about how one of our senior researchers came to be the host of the UK’s beloved annual Royal Institution public lecture series.

The first one was written by me, the latter one by our Research Marketing Manager Andy Dunne. We edited each other’s articles and various team members were involved in polishing and proofing. Publishing each one felt like a genuine team effort!

Off to a good start

The early analytics of the new kind of content look very promising. Looking at the pageviews of our research content in last three months, the story about the Syrian researcher is comfortably the most popular piece of editorial content we’ve published. The news item that comes closest has over a third less pageviews.

The article about our researcher hosting the Christmas Lectures is in the fourth spot after an old case study about some of our most well-known research (consistently one of our most popular pieces of editorial research content), and a news item about a clinical trial of our smart bandage prototype. That one was published in late November while our feature article was published on the 21 December, so I’m expecting the feature to rack up some more views in the coming weeks.

Why I like it

From a very practical point of view, the best thing about this new kind of content is its longevity. While news items act as a useful reference back to a specific point in time, the feature-style content stays topical for much longer. It’s a far more natural type of content for reusing without edits - whenever a relevant news story arises or a new research paper is published by the academic, it can simply be tweeted or pinned to the landing page of a department as it is.

A nice additional bonus in the process has been seeing how well this content fits into the new templates of beta.bath.ac.uk. Compared to the old templates, the user experience as a publisher has also been top notch! It’s been super easy to upload and publish these.

On a personal note, I really enjoyed the process of interviewing and writing. As an Editor, it’s rare I get to be involved at that stage - my job’s more planning, delegating and subediting. Getting to meet the researcher, listen to them passionately talk about their work and trying to capture that passion in the copy is a process I sometimes miss from my journalism days.

Posted in: Beta, Content design, Content Publisher

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