Educational Research In Context

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  • The absurdity of Human Capital Theory

    Bath's Hugh Lauder is an international authority on the death of Human Capital Theory as a workable, or now even coherent, economic theory. In truth, it's a political and administrative convenience gone way beyond its explanatory power. Yet national and...

  • Gender/Sex Recognition

    A detail about the status quo seems often missed by folk dialoguing on trans issues as they pertain to social policy and education in particular. It's that the 2004 Gender Recognition Act does not conform to theories which dichotomise gender...

  • Eugenics and The Spectator

    Bath is essentially a science university with a strong eye to ensuring as many Bath graduates as possible make good money in their chosen discipline. It's astonishingly effective in this respect, with an enviable reputation for graduate destinations and salaries....

  • Scientific Racism 2.0

    A number of prominent science authors who research in the field of human genetics, including the BBC's Adam Rutherford, have supported a new blogpost by Ewan Birney.  Its purpose is ostensibly as an "explainer" aimed at allaying public fears about...

  • Bias in education expenditure which favoured better-off has disappeared

    Here's a report from the Institute of Fiscal Studies (IFS). It shows how the historical  bias in education expenditure which favoured the better-off declined radically in the first decade of this century, and has now disappeared altogether. Readers here will...

  • The 'Education is broken' trope

    There's a piece in this week's Observer entitled; "Our failing education system means its still no easier to climb life's ladder". The notion of an education system failing wholesale is of course a trope popular amongst people who want radical...

  • Academic freedom and non-democracies

    Many UK universities have close academic relationships with non-democratic states. The reasons, often to do with income and helping states modernise their societies and infrastucture, are well-rehearsed. There's a story in the papers at the moment, though, where the compromises...