Exchange

Sharing ideas for Learning and Teaching

Tagged: HSS

Joint student, practice, and academic conference

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📥  Case Studies

Nick Willsmer, from the Department for Heath at the University of Bath, discusses a funded project initiated by a student to run a conference for the Sports Performance field that involved a range of senior external academics as keynotes and research talks, practitioners from a range of fields, and undergraduate students presenting on dissertation topics. The event was successful and Nick presents the background, what they did and finally some of the lessons learnt.

 

Knowing yourself as a teacher

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📥  Reflections

Dr Ainius Lasas, from the Department of Politics, Languages and International Studies at the University of Bath, reflects on the importance of knowing yourself as a teacher and where that may be an advantage or a disadvantage.

 

Different sources of feedback

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📥  Reflections

Dr Ainius Lasas, from the Department of Politics, Languages and International Studies at the University of Bath, reflects on the useful and sometimes unexpected little ideas gained from additional feedback from different sources, even when one thinks things are going well.

 

Cultural contexts and approaches

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📥  Reflections

Dr Ainius Lasas, from the Department of Politics, Languages and International Studies at the University of Bath, discusses some ways in which the different cultural and academic backgrounds of his students lead to different approaches, which may be at odds with the required approach in a session.

 

Guiding the learning path

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📥  Reflections

Dr Ainius Lasas, from the Department of Politics, Languages and International Studies at the University of Bath, discusses how he views he role as a guide leading students to see connections and through a path of concepts he wants them to explore, but to see this for themselves

 

Balancing style, goals and students

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📥  Reflections

Dr Ainius Lasas, from the Department of Politics, Languages and International Studies at the University of Bath, discusses the balance between ones own personal style as a teacher, the specific learning goals you have for a course and the students preferences and what they want. Can you please everyone?

 

Guidelines for using blogs in higher education teaching -6 tips

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📥  Case Studies

Oliver Walton, University of Bath, October 2016

Why use blogs in your teaching?

Blogs are becoming more widely used in higher education, and a growing body of evidence has explored how they can enhance learning and teaching (Oravac 2003, Williams & Jacobs 2004). Blogs provide opportunities for students to write short pieces of text that can be easily shared with other students and teachers. Blogs are generally written in a more reflective, argumentative or informal style, and can encourage students to experiment with new arguments or ideas. In general, blogs provide scope to ‘broaden learner-learner and learner-teacher’ interaction (Blackstone & Harwood 2011). (more…)

 

Department GTA Support: SPS

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📥  Case Studies

This case study from Social and Policy Sciences, is part of a series providing short summaries of some of the different good practice models and approaches taken to department level support for graduate teaching assistants (GTAs).

Support for GTAs in SPS is now formalised and regularly reviewed. The list below provides a (brief) overview of the main activities and resources, with responsibility for these split between the department level and the unit convenor. The package of support provides initial introductions, specific support later in time when needed, and feedback/development for GTAs during their teaching. (more…)

 

Learning from Blogs – evaluating the learning and teaching benefits of using blogs in higher education

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📥  Case Studies

Summary

The project aimed to evaluate the use of blogs across a number of units in the SPS department with a view to enhancing existing practice, by carrying out a detailed assessment of how students’ learning can be enhanced by blogs, and by identifying any barriers to their effective use. The project showed that students in general found the approach useful, because it helped them to clarify their thoughts on a topic, develop a critical voice, and experience writing in a different style and audience. The key lessons in terms of incorporating this approach were to maximise opportunities for teacher/peer feedback and ensuring that the rationale was clearly explained. There was considerable differences in terms of students’ motivation. While some students were keen that blog-related exercises were graded, others particularly enjoyed the freedom and scope for experimentation that came when these exercises were not formally assessed. The findings of this evaluation will be disseminated through a set of practical guidelines to encourage the wider use of this teaching method across the university and an academic article. (more…)