Faculty of Engineering & Design staff

Sharing experience and best practice across the Faculty of Engineering & Design

Topic: Staff experiences

My Experience of the Mental Health First Aid Training

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📥  Staff experiences

Mental Health Awareness Week

A couple of weeks ago it was Mental Health Awareness Week. Mental health is finally being considered as something we should all take notice of in ourselves, those we care about and work with.

Not so long ago, mental health was not a 'thing'. If someone was struggling, there wasn't any help or support for them. People were shunned from society if they weren't 'normal'. We are lucky to now have the support we need and the knowledge we have about mental health.

Mental Health First Aid training course

I recently went on a two day training course called Mental Health First Aid. Within the first hour I realised something about myself that I hadn't before. I have always automatically assumed that what was meant by 'Mental Health' was illness, a negative association. But mental health can mean good mental health. It can be feeling calm, relaxed or happy. It doesn't have to be a negative thing such as depression or anxiety.

Being a yoga teacher outside of my office job means I know that feeling calm and at peace is essential to living a healthy life. Reducing stress and anxiety is paramount to keeping our body and mind healthy. What I had never taken the time to do was to notice that this is classed as good mental health. It surprised me to realise this. It seemed so obvious but no-one had said that to me before. It's not a separate thing from the phrase 'mental health'. And it's also not the case that we fit directly into the good or bad part. It's a scale. It might be that we are balanced in the middle of the scale and something happens in life that sends us one way or the other. If it's to the good part, we are ecstatic, peaceful, happy. If it's the bad, we might end up with a mental health disorder which sees us asking for help to overcome or manage it. Everyone is as susceptible as anyone else. We shouldn't think that it can never happen to us. I think losing the idea that mental health only means illness opens it up as a topic for people to talk about. It takes away the idea that mental health is something to be scared of.

The two day training took us through many of the mental health disorders; how to spot symptoms, how to offer help yourself and where to refer people to for professional help. We spoke about depression, anxiety, panic attacks, personality disorder, schizophrenia, suicide. And this isn't all of them. It was an intense two days.

I learnt loads of information that I hadn't had the opportunity to before. I found it really useful to learn how mental health disorders can express themselves. What was even more useful was learning about how to deal with colleagues or students who might be suffering. Before this course, it would have been something I shied away from as I wouldn't have known what to do or whether what I was saying was correct. We are quite often caught up in our own head, thinking about our own things. Going on this training opened my eyes, teaching me to look around and notice what's happening to others. Showing compassion to your work colleagues is important. If someone is quiet and subdued one day and this isn't their normal behaviour, be sensitive to this. They might have things going on that you don't know about. It taught me to look out for changes in people's behaviour and gave me resources to turn to if I felt I needed them, for myself or others. I would urge anyone, if presented with the opportunity, to go on this course.

Remember to take a break

Mental Health Awareness Week dedicates an entire week (8th-14th May) to raising awareness of mental health. This week removes the taboo surrounding mental health. The University offers loads of positive workshops to help to counteract any problems people might be having with their own mental health. Rather than focusing on the negative side of mental health (the view that mental health is bad or scary and where people might disassociate from sufferers), this week promotes the idea that we should all take better care of ourselves. We should all make an effort to reduce our stress levels, breathe more deeply, take regular breaks away from our desk. Although we can't control everything that happens to us, we can control how we react to it. Taking the time to make sure your stress levels are low by doing the things you love like walking your dog, swimming, seeing friends all help to make sure we keep ourselves mentally fit. We will then react better to those moments in life that might send us off balance. Just as we would go running if we'd put on a few pounds, we also have to exercise the mind and keep it fit. If we forget about it, it is more susceptible to illness - exactly the same as our physical body.

Although there is a week dedicated to raising awareness, it's important to remember that our own mental health is something we should bear in mind all the time. Whenever you can feel that you are off balance, that you might be sliding down the scale, try and catch yourself. Life produces many traumatic events for us to get through. Without scaring you, it's these types of events that affect our mental health and can leave us with depression, anxiety, panic attacks etc. The more you can do to make your mind fit now, the less these events may affect you if they happen.

 

Seven questions with Sue Fairhurst

  

📥  Celebrating success, Staff experiences, Staff insight, Top tips

I recently chatted to Sue Fairhurst prior to her retirement from the University, where she has enjoyed a successful career providing an in-house graphic design service for "anything and everything that needs to be designed or printed".  I asked Sue seven questions relating (mostly) to her experience of working here at the University.

Image of Sue Fairhurst

Sue Fairhurst (right)

1. How did you choose your career?
"I feel blessed because I didn’t chose my career; my career chose me!  Art was something that was innate within me; something that I didn’t just want to do – I had to do it.  As a child I drew all the time and my favourite subjects were horses and Botticelli maidens.  I wasn’t interested in going to University, but my school strongly encouraged me to follow a higher education pathway.  As a concession I agreed to apply for a teacher training post.  However, on a visit to Bristol I discovered Bristol Art College at Bower Ashton, which is now the University of the West of England.  I applied and never looked back."

2. What is the best thing about your job?
"The best thing about my job is the variety of challenges that tend to occur every day.  I really enjoy thinking of different ways of tackling new challenges."

3. What is the most important piece of advice you would give to a new member of staff?
"I think good communication is key.  Find out how the University works and get involved.  Be confident and stay true to yourself."

4. What has been your greatest success/achievement at work?
"While I’ve enjoyed many projects here, I think being involved with the implementation of the new University branding in 2010 was a particular high point.  The entire marketing process was an exciting journey, and seeing the results of our work made us all feel proud.  Open days in particular suddenly became really exciting events."

5. What is your favourite book/album?
"I love reading, and although I’ve read a lot of books, I think I would choose Dickens’ ‘Our mutual friend’ as a particular favourite.  The album is a bit more difficult because I listen to so much music.  My first album was ‘Sweet Baby James’ by James Taylor, so that’s a special one for me.  However, I also love Neil Young’s ‘Harvest Moon’ and I’ll listen to anything and everything by Ry Cooder."

6. Who or what inspires you and why?
"I love trees!  Nature is inspiring because it never lets you down.  I’ve always enjoyed my drive to work, taking what I think of as the back way from Bristol to Bath through Bitton and Kelston where the views are so beautiful.  I’m also aware of how much the University grounds have developed since I’ve worked here, and I’m really grateful to have worked in such lovely surroundings.  My dad was also an inspiration.  He valued happiness and encouraged me to do exactly what I wanted to do - as long as I was happy."

7. If you could choose one luxury item on a desert island what would it be?
"Communication is so important to me.  I love listening to music and I also like listening to serious documentaries and chat shows, so I think I would have to choose a radio as my luxury item."

 

 

Seven questions with Andy Matthews

  

📥  Celebrating success, Staff experiences, Staff insight, Top tips

Last month I chatted to Andy Matthews who is a Senior Technician in the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering. Andy is responsible for the Undergraduate teaching labs, managing the risk assessment and practical needs of students undertaking project work. He’s also responsible for access and security in 2 East. I asked Andy seven questions relating (mostly) to his work here at Bath. Here they are, together with his response:


1. What is the most enjoyable aspect of your job?

"I really enjoy working with young people who are at such an optimistic stage of their lives and who don’t see any limits to their horizons.  It’s great being in that environment every day". 

Andy Matthews in the Electrical Engineering lab

Andy Matthews in the Electrical Engineering lab

2. How do you prepare for a typical working week?

"I make a list and try to prioritise the items. I can’t plan too far in advance because issues can arise at the last minute, and I may need to adapt my list according to demand.

I always have a big breakfast!"

3. What are your tips for effective leadership?

"I try to understand the different strengths of each team member. I work with this and organise tasks in accordance with their strengths and comfort zones."

4. How do you resolve difficult moments at work?

"I’m always mindful of University policies, but flexibility is also important. If a student makes a non-standard request relating to project work I always try to adapt our services to meet their requirements - unless there is a health and safety issue. We can never compromise on health and safety."

5. What is the most useful piece of advice you have ever been given?

"Two pieces of advice spring to mind:

  • To value your friendships – which I try to do! 
  • To always have some sort of plan and never simply hope for the best."

6. Who or what inspires you and why?

"Students inspire me. The enthusiasm they have for their project work motivates me to try my best for them, and I never feel I don’t want to come to work. I usually finish each week with a real sense of achievement."

7. If you didn’t do this job, what would prefer to be doing?

"I’ve always been interested in aviation, and a job flying light aircraft for an aid agency or something similar would be a great alternative."

Thanks Andy!

 

 

Why I (mostly) like using the new CMS

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📥  Staff experiences, Staff insight

I've had a long hiatus from using the new CMS, but with our Faculty pages finally live, it feels like things are moving again and I've been reacquainting myself with the new system. I'm reminded every time I log into our old CMS what a better system we now have for those who update the website and those who read it. Here's why:

It forces you to write coherently

Before I even create a page in the new CMS I have to select a content type. This involves a good 10 minutes of working out what will fit my purpose. If I'm telling a story I'll probably select the case study content type, but I'll use a campaign if I'm writing persuasive content with lots of calls-to-action or a guide if I'm explaining something.

Once that's sorted I have to fill out a user need. I find this a really (really) tiresome job, but it's a good check to see if you are actually about to create a coherent page that someone will find useful. It's pretty tempting to stray into writing something you want to say and adding in content that is perhaps related but not directly relevant. When I scroll back up the page to check its user need, it helps me to refocus my writing on the intended audience: why am I doing this? Why is it important to someone?

It provides a structure to guide you

I'm not a fan of filling in boxes and until they introduced a preview button I really struggled to use the new CMS. I am often driven nuts by the word limits. For me the most annoying box of all is the one under the title, which is limited to 160 characters. I agonise over that box for about half the time the rest of the page will take. Then I turn around and show Becky and we agonise some more. The secret is, when you've got that sentence or two right, the rest of the page will follow. Getting it right in 160 characters means that you really know what your page is going to be about.

Screenshot of a page title and tag line

The 160 character tag line

I see now that other than the really useful things word limits ensure (not least how the pages are displayed in Google search results) they are actually helping me to write better. They force me to really get to the point and be concise. They are challenging me (quite literally, the page won't save if I've written too much) to take my time and really think things through. What I once raged against I see now is a support (still a frustrating one though) to guide my content and stop me settling for the quick win and a quiet life.

It demands better content

Pages need to have real substance now with information that delivers value or answers a question. Even the photos have to be better, a 16:9 ratio is unforgiving to non-professional shots. Using the new templates makes me realise how much we have been able to hide behind HTML styling in the old CMS. I was pretty horrified when I found out I wouldn't have access to the code in the new system (there's a part of me that would still like to have the option) but it really does make me focus on the quality of the content rather than spending 5 minutes faffing with a boxout. What I once saw as crushing the creativity of the content producer I now understand to be for the benefit of consistency.

Why you should find out more about it

Change can be a brutal process. I have often felt disheartened and confused during this CMS transition project. I still despair on a monthly basis, but when I look at a new page on a mobile I find my answer: the content and the design are so much better. I know the way to overcome many (not all) of my CMS frustrations is to learn more. Find out the rationale behind the compromise, the reason why my status quo has been challenged, what benefit a perceived sacrifice has been made for. I follow the Digital's team blog, 'watch' their release notes wiki page, attend their Show & Tell sessions, and most importantly click that 'suggest an improvement to this page button' and just find out why.

Once you know the thought behind the content strategy and the coding you will feel reassured as to the talent working on this new system and have faith in its ability to get better. I once used to ask myself "why is this happening on our watch?" Now I understand what an opportunity it is to question, to rethink, to reflect and improve. I wouldn't give up the past difficulties or the ones to come because it only makes us think more. With understanding it's impossible to return to before, there's only new ways, better ways.

 

The Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) for beginners ….

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📥  Staff experiences, Staff insight, Uncategorised

Back in December Selina (Jobson) and I thought we’d try and get to grips with the latest educational acronym  ‘TEF‘ and find out what on earth its all about.  Spoiler alert – there are a quite a few acronyms coming up! We attended a briefing event in London at which representatives from the Dept. of Education (DofE), the Higher Education Academy (HEA), and the National Union of Students (NUS) explained what TEF is, how it will operate and what it’s meant to achieve. The day also included presentations from two University administrators on how their Institutions are preparing for TEF, a presentation from the Vice Chancellor of the University of Greenwich and a general discussion.

So… what is TEF?

It’s a scheme introduced by the government with the aim of measuring the quality of teaching at Higher Education Institutions (HEIs).  Universities will be given a rating to indicate the level of teaching quality they provide and as the scheme moves forward it will cover teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels and then move on to give subject /discipline level ratings. There are three areas (criteria) against which Universities are rated – Teaching Quality; Learning Environment and Student Outcomes & Learning Gain - which then produce one overall rating.  The ratings will be Gold, Silver and Bronze. This year it’s a voluntary scheme but the vast majority of HE Institutions have decided to participate (299 in total).

The government’s aim is that TEF will be used to:

  • Provide clear information to students about where the best provision can be found
  • Encourage providers (i.e. Universities) to improve teaching quality to reduce variability
  • Help drive UK productivity by ensuring a better match of graduate skills with the needs of employers and the economy
  • It will also be used as a mechanism to allow Universities to raise the level of tuition fees charged to students (more on this later!) and to promote quality, choice & greater competition.

How will it work?

TEF ratings will be mainly assessed by metrics – what are those I hear you cry? Metrics are large sets of data and statistics which Universities already coordinate and provide to bodies such as the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE). It will also be important that all academics involved in teaching have recognised Teaching Qualifications – here at Bath there is likely to be a major push to ensure this happens.  Three years-worth of metrics will be used for TEF and they are

  • National Student Survey (NSS)  - for info on students’ perceptions of the quality of teaching, assessment, feedback, academic support
  • Destination of Leavers from HE (DLHE) – the annual survey of recent graduates which provides info. on what our graduates are doing e.g. are they in ‘graduate’ employment or further study or unemployed!
  • Higher Educations Statistics Agency (HESA) data – the annual return which is prepared by SREO and which covers recruitment and retention (in broad terms the number of ‘student bums on seats’)
  • In the future TEF might also include additional metrics e.g. Longitudinal Earnings Outcome (LEO) data (what type of employment graduates have 5 years after graduation).

Each University also submits a written report (limited to 15 pages – the font and margin sizes have also been specified). This written report should explain or comment on any anomalies in the metrics (contextualise the data) but primarily focus on the impact and effectiveness of teaching. The ‘student voice’ is also supposed to be clear within the written report. Ultimately each University’s written submission will be published.

The metrics and written submission are then considered by the TEF Assessment Panel, chaired by Prof Chris Husbands, VC at Sheffield Hallam University (appointed by the government for 2 years).  The TEF Panel will announce the outcomes and award Universities Gold, Silver or Bronze ratings which are valid for 3 years. If a University has been awarded a ‘bronze’ it could choose to reapply to TEF in subsequent years to try and raise its rating but otherwise you keep your rating for three years.

What’s the timeline?

We’re in the first ‘proper’ year of TEF (elements of the process were kick-started in 15/16 TEF year 1 which is why 2016-17 is referred to as TEF year 2).

The University submitted its written report at the end of January, the TEF Panel will now start reviewing all the metrics and reports from all participating Institutions and the outcomes will be announced in late May. We’ll find out whether we’ve got GOLD!!

Next year (2017-18) the TEF approach will applied to subject level pilots and in the following year (2018-19) taught postgraduate programmes will be included.

Talking points

Not surprisingly there’s a lot of discussion and debate about TEF. Here’s a potted summary of views and opinions about TEF,

  • There’s a general welcome for the focus on teaching and the quality of student’s learning experience, as it’s considered to be long overdue.
  • There are hopes that the esteem and profile of teaching will be raised (compared to research).
  • However there’s concern that the metrics themselves don’t actually tell you how ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ a University’s teaching is and in any case no-one really seems to be able to define what ‘Teaching Excellence’ is (although apparently everyone knows it when they see it). What for example can the metrics on post University destinations and employment tell us about the quality of teaching a student received?
  • TEF ratings (gold, silver etc.) will be directly linked to the level of fees a University can charge its students. From 2018-19 those Universities with a gold or silver rating will be allowed to increase undergraduate fees at a higher rate than those Universities with a bronze rating. Over time this will lead to a widening gap between higher and lower fee charging Universities. The NUS is particularly unhappy about the link between TEF and fee levels and has voted to boycott the National Student Survey (NSS) in protest. As the NSS scores are one of the key TEF metrics it’s not entirely clear what impact the boycott will have.
  • The NUS is also concerned that the reliance and focus on metrics will drown out the  ‘student voice’
  • There are significant reputational implications for Institutions awarded a bronze or even a silver award. Who wants to go to a University that’s not got gold?
  • Subject level TEF will be a whole new challenge – what happens if at a subject level you’re rated bronze but at a university level you're rated gold (already being referred to as medal clash)?

What’s been happening here at Bath

The University’s written report went in to the TEF Panel at the end of January.  I don’t know what went into the report or who was consulted but I should think the Students’ Union was involved.  There’s a real drive towards getting all academic staff involved in teaching to have formal Teaching Qualifications, which you may have heard discussed in various fora. The Bath branch of the NUS is formally participating in the boycott of NSS (more details can be found here: https://www.nus.org.uk/Documents/Boycott%20the%20NSS%20Flyer_.pdf.

And if you’re interested in finding out more…

Come and have a chat with me (Rachel Summers) or Selina - we most definitely do not have all the answers but might be able to point you in the right direction to find them.

 

An Apple a Day...

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📥  Staff experiences

I recently took part in an experiment here at Bath University for the BBC Two show, Trust Me I’m a Doctor, presented by Michael Mosley, Chris van Tulleken, Saleyha Ahsan and surgeon Gabriel Weston.

Taking part in a television show was a complete first for me, so I had really no idea what to expect.

As it was part of an experiment here at the university, that took some of the pressure off being filmed, as I had a very clear idea of what I (and the group) was supposed to be doing, and when.

The experiment itself was a study of dieting vs. exercise, and which activity can help you lose weight quicker. It was conducted for the Department of Health and lead by the university’s own Dr Javier Gonzalez. It took place over two days, and involved a series of blood tests, fasting periods, and some track running for the group that I was part of!

Day 1 saw the entire group consume a breakfast of around 750 calories (muesli), a blood test before and after, and a simple period of rest afterwards, followed by a further blood test.

On day 2, we were split into two groups: Diet and Exercise. The diet group’s day was exactly the same as day one, only this time their breakfast had 500 calories worth of muesli removed. My group, the exercise group, were instructed to run enough laps of the running track to burn 500 calories (that was the tough part!), followed by eating the same 750 kcal breakfast.

I won’t spoil the results, so you’ll have to tune in to see – Wednesday 1st February, BBC 2 at 8pm.

At first I thought it would be quite nerve-wracking to be on film, knowing that it’s going to be viewed by potentially thousands of people, but actually that aspect of it feels so far removed at the time that I didn’t even think about it! Being filmed as part of a group also helped, not to mention the fact that the film crew was made up of only two people for the majority of the time.

It gave me a new perspective on TV shows in general and has really lead me to question the way some of my other favourite shows are filmed.

Overall, being part of BBC Trust Me I’m A Doctor was a fantastic experience that I would do again in an instant (depending on how tough the experiment is!). I was quite interested in health and well-being before taking part, but it has given me a renewed outlook on exercise and food in relation to living a healthy lifestyle.

And of course, I couldn't resist getting a shot with the man himself:

MeandMichael

 

Faculty Student Centre team building

  

📥  Staff experiences

Last week, the Undergraduate Team and Graduate School took part in a team building day where we spoke about the new structure the teams will be moving in to.

As you may or may not know, the Undergraduate Team and Graduate School will be merging into one office which will be known as the Faculty Student Centre. The move will be taking place before the New Year.

Artist's impression of the 2 East Faculty Student Centre

Artist's impression of the 2 East Faculty Student Centre

So, preparing for this change in environment and responsibilities, we took the time out of our day to get to know each other a bit better.

Using a range of exercises, the facilitator allowed us to grow stronger as a team and we were all very pleased (and relieved!) to find out we’re all on the same page.

We were asked to explain what the aim of the new office was. We came up with the following statement:

“We support the academic process of the student journey from induction to graduation for the Faculty of Engineering & Design departments; Architecture & Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Electronic & Electrical Engineering and Chemical Engineering.”

In order to achieve this, we thought it was a good idea to list what we can help students and staff with.

The Faculty Student Centre will be able to help you with and will be responsible for:

  • Overseeing assessment set-up and creation
  • Contributing to user groups throughout the University
  • Information and support for students and staff
  • Overseeing the student life cycle
  • Data processing
  • Coursework hand-ins
  • Student progression
  • Committees and meetings
  • Timetabling
  • Raising casual worker contracts
  • Knowing and advising on NFAAR regulations
  • Transcript requests
  • Signposting to other services offered by the University

We can offer lots of support so the best thing to do is to come in and visit us to find out more.

The main message of the day was that we all want to work with trust and respect for each other. We want to do a good job to get students through the whole of their programme of study smoothly. And we also want to do this in a safe and diverse environment.

 

The Life of a Business Apprentice

  

📥  Staff experiences

Apprenticeships are government funded training programmes that combine job training with nationally recognised qualifications. It is an incredible opportunity to gain and develop skills, have a wide range of opportunities and you get paid whilst you learn!

I started my apprenticeship in Business Administration at an intermediate level in December 2015, after briefly starting my A levels. I have now been working at the University for just over ten months and it is safe to say that I have really enjoyed it. I have had the opportunity to move around different offices within the Faculty such as: finance, departmental offices, placements and marketing. By moving around, I have gained an understanding to how the Faculty links together and which offices integrate well with each other.

I have been able to increase and develop skills in daily administrative tasks such as recording customer information in Access for placement students and SAMIS for potential applicants, taking calls from students and academics, and providing accurate advice to problems that may occur in the workplace to my colleagues. I have been able to collate documents for reports, organise data and provide customer service to students.

My two greatest achievements, of which I am most proud of, is creating a social media training module and helping organise the Vice-Chancellor's visit to the Faculty. I made this learning tool for members of administrative staff who were uncomfortable or not confident with posting on social media. I planned and mind mapped what I wanted to include in the module on areas such as how to post on Facebook, how to effectively use Twitter, and tips on social media in general. I used software called Xerte and created different activities such as an annotated diagram, an interactive list and model answers with feedback.

For the Vice-Chancellor's visit I ordered the catering, sorted out the layout of the venue and informed colleagues of the plan of the day. I also had the chance to show the Vice-Chancellor my social media training module and she indicated that this was a good achievement.

I have been very fortunate as I have been offered to continue working at the University, doing an advanced apprenticeship, which means I will be able to study for an additional eighteen months. I hope to be able to continue providing support to my colleagues and gain more valuable experience.

 

Apprentice Technician: Everyday something new

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📥  Celebrating success, Staff experiences

Emma Walker, former Apprentice Mechanical Engineering Technician, has been nominated to receive the Building Services Construction & Engineering Work Place Learner of the Year Award. This award recognises the hard work, application and excellence in both her academic studies and technical ability throughout the final year of her apprenticeship. Emma writes about how she came to the University and what she has achieved here:

I spent 18 months doing work experience at Designability, where they introduced me to the engineering industry and encouraged me to pursue my career as an engineer by applying for an apprenticeship at the University of Bath.

Being an apprentice here at Bath has been an amazing learning experience for me because you never do the same job twice; everyday you’re doing something new. I loved getting involved in the teaching labs, where I would help and guide the first-year students through their time in our workshop. This greatly improved my skills in speaking to a large group of people, and pushed me to grow my social skills.

I’ve learned how to use machinery such as mills and lathes, laser cutters, and 3D printers. I also passed my forklift licence. I finished my apprenticeship six months earlier than planned, and from here I was given the opportunity to cover another unit in composites, where I was able to learn about carbon fibre and other materials, and working with the autoclave. Since finishing my apprenticeship I have gone down the composites route, so being able to cover the extra unit has benefitted me greatly.

I have been very lucky to have such a great support system here in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, where everyone is happy to answer any questions I have and offer advice. My colleague Clare Ball gave me support to help me through my maths module and my Assessor, Rob Aldous, visited me at the University once a month. Rob always made sure I was being treated fairly and that I was getting the best experience out of my apprenticeship.

What I plan to do next is to broaden my knowledge within the work that takes place in the composites department. I want to learn more about the materials I will be working with and also learn about the maintenance work for the autoclave. In the future I want to look into doing a supervisory and management course, this will allow me to climb further up the career ladder and be able to offer more to this company.

An apprenticeship is a fantastic opportunity to start  your career, to learn new things every day and to get paid for it! However, an apprenticeship is not easy and is not something to take lightly, you have to work hard for the rewards an apprenticeship has to offer.