Tagged: OYW2016

Reflections upon traffic in Central London

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WhatsApp Image 2016-08-23 at 21.07.33

 

Spending a minute or two looking out on the bustling scene of Piccadilly Circus from a nearby rooftop, there are so many observations you can make about the state of much of today's world.

The first thing that catches your eye is the massive array of advertising boards. Then, you've got the plethora of stores underneath them. Both of these highlight just the importance of the roles of advertising, products and consumption in our modern society.

Then, look on a level down from that, and you see the traffic. The buses, the limousines, and the cyclists sandwiched in between- you see people are busy, people are going places. In doing so, many people are actually causing damage- releasing all sorts of pollution, and, over time, in aggregate causing substantial damage to their city and their planet. And they may never see the results of this damage- but their children and grandchildren most likely will.

Take an even closer look, and observe the people who are in these vehicles, and the people being sucked into these stores. You see people from all corners of the world. Whether they are tourists or migrants, you realise the sheer diversity of today's metropolis. The world is perhaps as small as it has ever been.

It's just one scene, but the world today is such that there are a million different observations that can be made about it.

How to do business, how to care for the environment, they are two topics which I am incredibly excited to hear about and discuss at this year's One Young World conference. But what I look forward to perhaps even more is the collection of people I'm about to meet- people from all nationalities, with different backgrounds and different reasons to be there. Because just like the photo above, OYW is a place to learn massive lessons about the state of today's world.

 

My chosen sessions for the Summit

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Hello again everyone,

Since my last post I have been given the opportunity to choose two sessions out of a huge variety on offer at the One Young World summit that interest me most. One is internal and the other external, and are run by people involved within the issues; whether that be through policy, charity or personal experience. I thought I would take this chance to explain to you what my choices are, and why I chose them. I hope by doing this it gives other students an opportunity to contact me with any ideas of thoughts they wish me to take forward to the sessions with me.

The first choice I made was to attend a session called 'Eliminating Domestic Violence through Education'. Within the session we will split into groups and talk about ways to install this teaching into educational settings, and what businesses and government can do to help.  I am a big advocate for using education as a way to tackle all kinds of world problems, whether that be physical or mental health, rights awareness or safety - so felt this sessions perfect for this personal belief. What really drew me in was the description of the session, stating that it was to help all young people, male and female, in their awareness of what domestic violence is and how to recognise it. I see much media awareness around women as victims of domestic violence, and I am not belittling their struggle, but young men also need a strong education on the matter. We are in need of  rising awareness of male mental health as recent figures show that male suicide rates are at their highest in the UK since 2001 (Davis C, The Guardian. 2015). If more young men are given a platform to speak about issues such as domestic violence against them, as well as other issues which are harmful to mental health and self worth, these figures may fall.

I hope to suggest this education as a platform to show how many have overcome such issues, and that there is a way forward for victims. A recent example I have seen of this is of Reshma Quereshi, a 19 year old girl from India who was a victim of an acid attack from her Brother in Law for 'defying' him. Since the attack which took place in 2014, Reshma has worked with charity Make Love not Scars (MLNS) and become the global face of the #EndAcidSale campaign which appealed directly to Indian government to stop the open sale of acid in the country. There are estimated to be over 1,000 victims of acid attacks in India each year, many of these with domestic origins. However, Reshma's latest platform is that she will be walking the New York Fashion Week runway in September which will bring global awareness to the reality of the acid attacks which are taking place everyday. An idea I have for the session is to suggest building a network of survivors who can go into schools and colleges and speak about the realities of domestic violence, and can show a real life example of overcoming and escaping their situations. I have provided a link from the New York Times 'Women in the World' section here so you can read Reshma's story and see a video of the moment she was told she would be walking the catwalk...

http://nytlive.nytimes.com/womenintheworld/2016/08/09/see-the-moment-acid-attack-survivor-reshma-quereshi-discovers-she-will-walk-at-ny-fashion-week/

My second sessions is called 'Connect in intimate conversations with refugees, activists, private sponsors, settlement workers and other members of the Refugee 613 coalition', this is so I can gain a better understanding of the refugee crisis from those who are most affected by it. There will be a number of speakers at the events who I will be able to interact with in conversations about all aspects of refugee life, including healthcare, education and settlements. I hope to see how different bodies feel about these issues, as there will be humanitarian workers, government officials as well as academics attending the session. Refugee 613 is a Canadian initiative based in Ottawa which allows residents to help bring refugees over to the country, or to sponsor them and even to help volunteer help. I wish to see how this charity are working with the Canadian Government and how much of a change it has brought about. It provides a fantastic platform for those who wish to help but are unaware of how they can do so to find exactly which role would suit them best.

I hope to speak to those present on how Education occurs in refugee camps, and if formal education is happening hat can be done to help strengthen it for the sake of the young people who will have no future otherwise. If any readers have any particular issues they would like to be brought up at the meeting then please let me know.

I hope this has given you readers a better feel for not only what the summit has to offer but also what issues I am most passionate about. Mohammed will shortly be doing a follow up post on which sessions he is attending, as we have both chosen differently so we can attend sessions on what interests us most.

Thank you for reading, to finsih I thought I would show you this video I found online the other day made by The Global Goals as I think it is a really fantastic piece of work that highlights key issues facing young girls worldwide, so I will leave you with this...#WhatIReallyReallyWant

 

 

 

Hello from Delegate number Two!

  

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Hello everyone!

As you learnt from Mohammed’s earlier post we are the two Delegates from Bath attending the One Young World summit at the end of the Summer. The opportunity is one I never would have expected to have and I am incredibly grateful to The University of Bath for making it a possibility. I cannot wait to travel over with Mohammed and fully immerse myself in every aspect of the event.

To introduce myself, I have just finished my second year at Bath where I am studying Education with Psychology. The degree allows me to study a broad range of issues facing children and young people from all around the world, from Education to child labour. Studying these areas has made me realise how many challenges are faced everyday by children worldwide and I look forward to engaging with other delegates and discussing these issues.

I am originally from Weymouth, a small seaside town in the south of England which is where I am spending my summer. I work in a small but well known fish restaurant here called the Crab House Café which I really enjoy, and from which I am learning more and more about fish every day. I really love living by the seaside and miss it hugely when I am in Bath, when I am home I try and spend as much time as possible on the beach.

Weymouth pleasure beach

A few days after returning from the Summit in October I will be starting a new job at The University of Oxford which I will be at for the duration of my work placement year as part of my degree. I will be working as part of two research teams looking into education provision within the UK, and how the home and the school can work in unison to develop a child’s being. I hope this year of experience in a real life research situation will equip me with the skills for a possible career in Educational research.

I hope by attending this summit I will be able to speak to like-minded people who feel this same passion about equal opportunities for all children. My main focus for the past year has been the astounding numbers of child refugees who struggle to have access to a stable home, let alone a consistent education.  I hope to see more being done to tackle this issue as soon as possible, otherwise whole generations may be lost.

Unlike Mohammad I do not have my own blog or channel, but I will be keeping all of you as up to date as possible on my journey too and time at the summit! A huge thank you again to Bath for this amazing opportunity, I am really excited about what the next year has in store for me.

Speak to you all soon!

 

 

 

An Introduction!

  

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Hello, my name is Mohammad Lone, and I have the honour of being one of the two delegates at the 2016 One Young World conference in Ottawa, Canada, representing the University of Bath. This year the conference will be held between the 28th of September and the 1st of October, so it's just a couple of months away, and we are both incredibly excited!

One-Young-World-Summit-2016-Ottawa-Canada

 

So, a little about myself...

I am a first year Economics student, born in India but raised in Taunton, a town not too far away from Bath. I like sports (however as a Chelsea fan, the past year has not been great for me), I like embarking on long late night walks, and generally I love to meet new people and learn from them. That's one of the main reasons why, despite being initially daunted, I have enjoyed university so much, and I am keen to make use of what I've learnt and develop further at this year's OYW conference.

More academically speaking, my interests lie in tackling social and economic inequality, the environment, and development economics. These are all covered extensively in my view by on one hand government policy, and on the other corporate behaviour- two areas I read a lot about and am looking forward to discussing and learning more about at the conference with other delegates.

What excites me most about OYW are the people. People like Muhammad Yunus (the Nobel prize winning founder of Grameen Bank), Arianna Huffington and Akala have long served as huge inspirations for me, and the opportunity to hear from such people in person is one that I cannot wait for. But it's not just these people that excite me- it's the other delegates who will be attending. Few (I think in the UK, zero) other universities offer such an opportunity to students, so Emma and I will probably be the among the youngest attendees. Other delegates will be from all kinds of places, such as private companies, charities, NGOs, and so on.

I was fortunate enough to get to know Ludi Wang (one of the 2015 delegates) over the past year, and the discussions we've had just walking around campus have had a profound impact on how I see key issues like the environment. I can't imagine what it'll be like to learn and be inspired by hundreds of people like her, from all around the world!

I run a website and YouTube channel, called poponomics. The aim of poponomics is to help people learn things (primarily economics related, but also politics, business, etc) that are often presented as overly complex matters by a lot of the media, without the prerequisite of a degree to understand what the heck I'm talking about. As well as this blog, which Emma will also be contributing to, I will be making use of poponomics to document the conference- both in day by day blogs and vlogs that will be posted on the YouTube channel.

So thanks for reading this introductory blog post, a massive thank you to the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences for giving us this opportunity, and I look forward to taking you along on this journey!