Sounds of the planet

Acoustic remote sensing and its uses in underwater environments

24 July 2014 – Glacier ice cubes and glacier work

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📥  From the field

Yesterday saw another successful deployment of DAB, the Directional Acoustic Buoy to track where underwater noise comes from exactly. Each survey starts in the same way: zooming in the boat to the fjord with the glacier, jumping on the beach to set up the cameras on the hills, and jumping back in the boat to deploy the DAB and get measurements. Zooming is of course an exaggeration: getting away from the base is a cautious start, as the skipper needs to negotiate between rocky outcrops (not visible at high tides, but still there and dangerous) and sometimes icebergs, Crossing the open sea to the fjord cannot be done too fast if the waves are too high, or the wind in the wrong direction. And once into the fjord, we have to zigzag between icebergs of different sizes. Jumping out of the boat is also an exaggeration: the seabed is very steep, and we have to wait until the very last seconds for the water to be shallow enough, getting into the water and holding on to the boat before painstakingly pushing it on shore away from the waves and the tide. Then, we lumber up the hill in our immersion suits. But the view from the top is worth it …

From the hill where our cameras are deployed, we get wide views over the entire Hans Glacier and its fjord, covered with icebergs of different sizes.

From the hill where our cameras are deployed, we get wide views over the entire Hans Glacier and its fjord, covered with icebergs of different sizes.

Today, we successfully deployed the long-term buoy which will measure ambient noise as winter sets in. We programmed it to start taking measurements from 15 November until the batteries run out (which should be in March 2015). This way, the buoy will record the onset of the ice cover in the fjord, and hopefully when it starts to break up in spring. To celebrate these different achievements, Jarek breaks out the whisky he had brought with him from Longyearbyen. And I carve some ice cubes out from one of the iceberg samples we brought back to the base for our experiments …

In the confined space of our dormitory, we have managed to organise a small celebration of a series of successful deployments. The ice cubes in the “wee drams” are carved from fresh ice samples.

In the confined space of our dormitory (Grant squeezed into one of the bunks to take this picture), we have managed to organise a small celebration for a series of successful deployments. The ice cubes in the “wee drams” are carved from fresh ice samples.

 

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