Let's talk about water

Whetting appetites for Bath's water research

Topic: Coastal and ocean engineering

Fellowship Success

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📥  Coastal and ocean engineering, Water, Environment and Infrastructure Resilience, Wessex Water

Two members of staff at the University of Bath have recently been awarded Fellowships from NERC.

Dr. Ilaria Prosdocimi from the Department of Mathematical Sciences has been awarded a Industrial Innovation Fellowship with a project titled "Developing Innovative Flood Frequency Estimation for a Resilient nation (DIFFER)". ​ The project aims at developing innovative statistical methods to estimate flood risk across the UK based on existing but under-utilised records, with a special focus on the identification of possible increases in flood frequencies in the recent years. The project will rely on the collaboration with governmental and industry partners.

Dr. Danielle Wain from the Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering has been awarded a Industrial Mobility Fellowship with a project titled "Stirring things up: Do surface mixers in drinking water reservoirs improve water quality?". The project will focus on turbidity in raw water and will be a combined field and modelling project on Durleigh Reservoir with Wessex Water.

 

Experimental work in University College London

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📥  Coastal and ocean engineering, Water, Environment and Infrastructure Resilience, WISE CDT

The following blog post was contributed by WISE CDT student Ioanna Stamataki from the University of Bath who spent six weeks in University College London (UCL) undertaking her experimental work.


The last six weeks have been a bit of a blur – so intense and full of new experiences and knowledge that sometimes I am wondering if it actually happened. During my time in UCL, I was based in CEGE, the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering at UCL, but I was using the shared Civil and Mechanical Engineering fluids laboratory based in Mechanical Engineering.

Wilkins Main Building, UCL

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The Future of UK Coastal Research

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📥  Coastal and ocean engineering, Water, Environment and Infrastructure Resilience, WIRC @ Bath

The following blog post was contributed by Chris Blenkinsopp from the Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering.


The 13th UK Young Coastal Scientists and Engineers Conference (YCSEC) was held at Bath on 11-12th April as part of the University’s 50th Anniversary celebrations organised by the Water, Environment and Infrastructure Resilience (WEIR) research group and WIRC @ Bath.  The goal of the conference is to provide a unique opportunity for leading young coastal scientists and engineers working in academia and industry throughout the UK to present their work and network with their peers.  Building on the success of previous conferences, the 13th YCSEC brought over 60 early career researchers and practitioners from more than 30 UK and overseas universities, research institutes and companies together for two days of fascinating presentations and exciting discussions.

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Special WIRC PhD Colloquium

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📥  Coastal and ocean engineering, Urban water management, Water supply from source to tap, Water, Environment and Infrastructure Resilience, WIRC @ Bath, WISE CDT

At this special WIRC colloquium, we are exicted to introduce Mr Qiang Chen and Miss Olivia Cooke, both PhD students at the Department of Architecture & Civil Engineering, University of Bath.

When
Thursday 16th February 2017 at 1.15pm

Where
Room 4.8, Chancellor's Building, University of Bath (Location and maps)

Development and application of a novel PIC method to Fluid-structure interactions

Qiang ChenQiang Chen

PhD Research Programme in Civil Engineering, University of Bath

Abstract
With increasing computing power, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling has been considerably developed in many research areas. This work is motivated by developing a hybrid method for numerical modelling of fluid-structure interaction in the coastal and offshore engineering environment. In particular, this is based on the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method where both particles and grid are utilised. While the particles are used for tracking free surfaces and solving the nonlinear advection term of the Navier-Stokers equations in a Lagrangian manner, the underlying grid is employed for solving the rest non-advection parts in an Eulerian sense. The idea being that the method should have both the flexibility and efficiency from pure Lagrangian methods (based on particles) and Eulerian methods (based on grid), respectively, with a reasonable accuracy.

Biography
Qiang obtained his Master Degree at Dalian University of Technology, China. He is now a PhD student of Dr Jun Zang at the WEIR research unit.

 

Assessment and mitigation of storm runoff loads from an informal settlement (slum)

Olivia CookeOlivia Cooke

PhD Research Programme in Civil Engineering, University of Bath

Abstract
One of the biggest global health problems today is that posed by urban conditions, most significantly in informal settlements. Within informal settlements, the lack of infrastructure including sanitation and sewage facilities can generate serious problems for health and the environment. Stormwater runoff influences these issues and it is necessary to understand the processes and characteristics of runoff to mitigate health risks from it. The aim of this PhD is to develop a scientific theory which determines how stormwater runoff, quality and quantity, is influenced by human and environmental factors, focussing on the case study of the informal settlement Enkanini, located in South Africa.

Biography
Olivia is a PhD Student on the WISE CDT based at the University of Bath in the Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering. She is part of both the Water, Environment and Infrastructure Resilience (WEIR) research group and the Water Innovation and Research Centre (WIRC). Olivia studied Geography under an Open Scholarship at Aberystwyth University and gained a First Class (Honours) BSc. During her third year, Olivia studied for a term at UNIS in Svalbard in the Arctic. Her post-graduate study was a Master of Research in The Science of Natural Hazards at the University of Bristol. Fieldwork included studying the natural hazards in Guatemala, followed by research in Ecuador for her dissertation on volcano risk at Cotopaxi Volcano. Olivia is currently in her second year of her PhD.

Olivia's supervisors are Dr Lee Bryant, Dr Thomas Kjeldsen and Dr Wesaal Khan (Stellenbosch University)