LITEbox

Digital playground

Topic: Event Review

Copyright

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📥  Event Review

This event on copyright was very well attended by staff from all areas of the University, and was presented by:
Lisa Slater – Solicitor, Legal Office
Caroline Brooks – Abel & Imray (Patent & Trade Mark Attorneys)
Simon Clegg – Battens Solicitors
Hannah South – Head of Library Academic Services
Claire Tylee – Bibliographic Services Librarian
Rob Hyde – Audio Visual Service Manager

There is soon to be a recording of the event available to watch

Lisa Slater began by introducing the context of this event. Copyright at the University needs to be paid more attention with the ever increasing use of technology (to access, use, store and publish ‘works’), as well as the confusion between content which is in the public domain and content which is publically available.

The University has a Revised IP policy which has largely been brought on by the increasing use of lecture capture, and the event followed by raising awareness of the importance of copyright & support available around campus.

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Using Voicethread to make the most of student authored online presentations

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📥  Event Review

This session on using student authored online presentations was presented by Dr Felia Allum and Dr Rita Chawla-Duggan, and facilitated by Geraldine Jones. Both presenters use Voicethread as the presentation software, as it is free and intuitive to use. Recordings for each slide/image/video are separate to each other so no complex editing needs to take place. You can watch a recording of the event to catch up.

Rita Chawla-Duggan's use of student authored online presentations

Felia Allum's use of student authored online presentations

 

Benefits of using student authored online presentations

  • Can engage with relevant people from all around the world
  • Allows seminar time to be used for active learning rather than watching other students present
  • Students can continually develop their language skills by hearing their own voices and repeating presentations until they are happy with what they have produced
  • Feedback from peers is much appreciated by the students
  • Builds the self confidence of those who may not like to perform a face to face presentation in front of a group
  • Useful skill to learn as now many job interviews are online

 

Event write up

Rita started the event by explaining how students can benefit from these presentations by linking theory with observed practice from a mini placement experience. A large benefit of these presentations in the Department of Education is that students are able to engage with teachers in professional practice locally and around the world. Observations and data gained through virtual school visits are presented via Voicethread. Then feedback is offered via Voicethread from peers and the teachers involved. Rita showed some examples of presentations which students had created using Voicethread. Two first year students then gave their opinions and reflections on using this software, including how they have developed their analytical and research skills.

Felia then presented reasons why she uses these online presentations, again with Voicethread, focusing on how seminar time is freed up for more engaging face to face activities. Felia noted that this does mean harder work for the seminar leader, as activities have to be carefully planned rather than just listening to and marking presentations. There is an added benefit of confidence building for both international students being able to rehearse their English language until they are satisfied, and native English speakers being able to practice and listen back to themselves when presenting in a foreign language.

Please be aware that even though the privacy of each video on Voicethread can be change, they are uploaded outside of single sign on so students have to be made aware of copyright issues and how to source and attribute materials available under creative commons licences.

 

Questions and answers

What is the student feedback?

They find these presentations less stressful, but they still need to develop their real presentation skills so that needs to be taught elsewhere on the course. The more shy students tend to interact more with these presentations. As mentioned before, the international students really do appreciate being able to hear their own English and repeat it a few times until they are happy with their results.

Are there any barriers to students using this technology, and if so do you have tips to help overcome these?Geraldine, E-Learning Officer, runs a short induction for students with examples of how the software works, provides a digital guide on Moodle. In addition there are 'how to' videos on the Voicethread website. As such there have been no issues or problems with students creating presentations.
Students can use any computer to create their presentations, including those on campus. Headphones with microphones are offered for those who need them, generally only one or two students a year borrow them.

Do you provide a structure for students to follow, and in there generally less of a format when students create online presentations?
The academic guidelines are similar to face to face presentations in that students still need to demonstrate their understanding of concepts, including readings and analysis. The assessment criteria remain the same, and sometimes the students can get very creative in what they produce. A slide limit (10) and a time limit (not more than 10 minutes) helps to keep the presentations focussed

Do peers have to look at each other's work?
Felia responded. Yes but sometimes they don't comment at all when looking at the work of others, but now they are being encouraged to make a comment at the end just to say that they have read and understood the presentation. This means that students are much better prepared for seminars.

Is Voicethread free to use or licenced to the University?
It is free to use software, and anyone can sign up for a free account. It was chosen for this reason as well as being very intuitive to use.

Are there any privacy issues?
Each presentation is given a secret URL, and the students post these to a closed Moodle group. By default the presentations are private to the author. You have to explicitly share the presentation in Voicethread so that others with the link can view and comment.

 

Exploring augmented reality

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📥  Event Review

While augmented reality is usually used for public engagement and marketing around campus, it can be used to enhance learning and teaching. For example, the Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology use augmented reality to simulate conditions to support diagnosis and prescription discussions with students.

LTEO recently ran an event titled Exploring Augmented Reality. You can view a full recording of Exploring augmented reality event.

If you would like help incorporating augmented reality into your teaching, please contact e-learning.

Learn more about Aurasma: augmented reality software which can be used on your smartphone around campus:

 

Moodle for summative assessments to reduce marking time, minimise selective learning, and provide timely feedback

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📥  Event Review

Dr Momna Hejmadi, Department of Biology & Biochemistry, gave a presentation on the topic of using multiple choice questions (MCQs) in Moodle for summative assessment, with many tips and points to consider. Momna's experience comes from having been involved with a TDF project to investigate the use of Moodle quizzes for assessment across multiple departments.

Read Momna's case study including: context; how it was set up; benefits; and points to consider when trying this yourself

Watch a full recording of the event (27 minutes plus discussion)

The main drivers for moving towards using Moodle MCQs for asssessment were:

  • NSS/PTES scores
  • Students prefer timely feedback rather than quality feedback#1
  • Increasing student numbers (349 cohort in 2015/16)
  • Time pressures on staff in enhancing research metrics
  • Selective/Strategic learning in years 1 and 2.

The first year in which Momna trailed this new system ran smoothly, however the second year with an even further increased cohort size did not. At this point the contingency plan was used, which is why Momna stressed that involving AV, registry and e-learning at all stages of design and implementation was necessary.

If you are interesting in using MCQs in your teaching, read the case study on using Peerwise which allows students to create and answer their own MCQs across the cohort.

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Peer evaluation: Moodle Workshop Tool and Web PA

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📥  Event Review

This session was jointly ran by Jeff Barrie, Department of Mechanical Engineering, who presented WebPA for peer moderated marking, and Dr Richard Kamm, School of Management, who presented Moodle Workshop for peer evaluation on essay proposals.

You can watch back a recording of the full session on Panopto for a presentation on WebPA, Moodle Workshop, and a discussion at the end.

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How to manage your online profile

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📥  Event Review, Students' Union

Another successful event ran by the Students' Union Skills Training team took place recently, on the topic of managing your online profile. Topics include social media, privacy, and tips for the perfect LinkedIn profile. The event can be viewed back at any time, although if you attend the sessions there are some beneficial interactive group activities.

Check out Skills Training's up to date list of skills training activities.

online profile

 

Using tablets and other technology in research-inspired teaching

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📥  Event Review

Dr Kit Yates shared his experiences of using the media to publicise research, research inspired teaching, and also using iPads in class for teaching. A brief write up is below, and you can also download the full presentation for more detail. A recording is available to watch now.

Public engagement

Public engagement focused on your own specific research has the benefits of allowing you to:

  • become more familiar with your own research and being able to explain it engagingly and in an easy to understand way
  • think about impact and then generate grant applications
  • generate publicity for your work and get the recognition you deserve.

When entering into public engagement for the first time you should consider starting off small, such as Ignite Talks, Bath Taps into Science, Pint of Science, etc.

Kit spoke about his experiences of writing for The Conversation (a news site written by academics from around the world, to which the University of Bath pays a subscription), having his work covered by various journalists for different publications and even speaking on BBC radio 4’s Today programme

For more information, read a research marketing blog post titled Making headlines with research, visit the public engagement website, or talk to the press office.

Research inspired teaching

Research inspired teaching in beneficial for both students and teachers. Students have some real world context of what they are learning, begin to think like experts and develop a deeper knowledge rather than rope learning. Staff can then give more engaging and interactive lectures, while also being able to reflect further on their own research while learning from students.

Flipping the problem class

Intended learning outcomes of the unit were out of line with what was actually being delivered, and the material taught didn't fully align with summative assessment.

Rather than running through problems and pre-written code in class, pre-recorded solutions with audio feedback were recorded with an iPad were put onto panopto/Moodle for students to learn in their own time. This then allowed Kit to construct code from scratch in the face to face sessions, in a much more engaging and useful way to teach the students coding.

Dr Kit Yates discusses how and why he changed his mathematical biology problem classes to focus more on the act of coding, inspired by a combination of flipping and apprentice model approaches.

Dr Kit Yates describes how he recorded his working through problem solutions on a tablet as an online resource to replicate some of the advantages of the live session over the solution sheet.

 

Lecturing with an iPad

Lecturing with an iPad is the alternative to using white/blackboards, visualisers or slides, each with their own advantages and disadvantages.

Dr Kit Yates reflects on his experience of using iPads in mathematics lectures as part of a trial to provide his pros and cons for their use.

Advantages of lecturing with an iPad:

  • Lectures can be uploaded quickly
  • Can efficiently switch between media
  • Can quickly back reference previous sections or lectures
  • Great for large lecture theatres as the text is always readable
  • No focussing problems which can occur on visualisers
  • No moving sheets up and down, so students can follow easily
  • Facilitates flipping
  • All the features of pen and paper, and many more (colours, highlighters, etc.)

Disadvantages of lecturing with an iPad:

  • Requires (lots of practice)
  • Set up is difficult and requires time each lecture
  • Lots of gear needed: iPad, HDMI/VGA adapters, styles, case, etc.)
  • Doesn't get significantly better feedback from students
  • Need a special pen/stylus for optimum writing

Kit uses an app called GoodNotes to write on. His iPad is connected to the first projector, and then also syncs the document to his laptop which projects the previous page onto a second projector. This means students can see the current page which Kit is writing as well as the previous page. In University Hall there is Apple TV which means he can wirelessly connect his iPad allowing him more mobility in lectures.

Kit's setup for using an iPad in class

Kit's setup for using an iPad in lectures

Student feedback on the use of the iPad is varied, but the iPad is generally considered to be no worse than black/whiteboards or visualisers. A selection of feedback received is given below:

“I don't think the use of the iPad enhanced learning.”
“I like the iPad with the two screens showing old and new material.”
“I prefer the iPad/visualiser as white board pens are usually quite low on ink.”
“No preference.”
“Prefer whiteboards – if I fall behind I know it will still be somewhere on the boards.”
“Standing up and writing on the board is more engaging.”

 

Technology Showcase

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📥  Case Studies, Event Review

On 19 February, four short presentations took place followed by a poster display. This event showcasing the use of technology within learning and teaching from different staff across the University gave the attendees an opportunity to share and discuss ideas, and was very well received.

"It was great to see the excellent work going on that we can all benefit from."

You can watch a recording of the presentations in case you were unable to attend the event, and read a summary of each of the presentations below.
 
 
Annotations on a tablet - Tim Lawrenson
Tim Lawrenson asks students to perform, record and send him a video of an activity in their own time, and then during class time uses a tablet to annotate over still or slow motion clips. This allows the students to see common mistakes, and also have instant feedback on their technique. There is very little problem with technology, however sometimes the filesize of the student videos can be too large for email.

The annotation app used is called Hudl Technique.

Tim Lawrenson discusses flipping his teaching on the BSc Sport and Exercise Science.

 
App Factory - Keith Brown
Due to a last minute space opening up, Keith Brown stepped up to present his development. He is developing apps for teaching and learning, and has implemented the App-Factory. This is an is an easy to use authoring system that has been used to deliver apps to students. Typically, app content includes slideshows, videos and quizzes. Student evaluation indicates that the apps have been well received by students. There was a great amount of interest in the App Factory both during the event and within feedback for the event.

For further information please see Keith’s blog, and if you are interested in making an app for your course then please email Keith directly at K.N.Brown@bath.ac.uk

The App Factory

 
Student projects - Rob Hyde & Alan Hayes
Final year computer science projects are set by Alan Hayes and Rob Hyde, who is effectively a customer to final year students. Different projects are set as tasks for students to give them some experience in this type of project, and developing something could have a real impact around campus. Example projects include a radio recorder to assist corporate comms, individual room timetables for each teaching space to be displayed outside the door, and a services dashboard for BUCS services.

If you would like to find out more, or suggest a project, please email either Rob Hyde at R.J.Hyde@bath.ac.uk or Alan Hayes at A.Hayes@bath.ac.uk.

 
2sli.de - Robin Shields
Robin Shields gave a live demonstration of free to use software called 2sli.de, which he has developed himself. Questions at the end were submitted via the attendees' devices and appeared at the front of the room for all to see.

Features of 2sli.de include:

  • embedded media
  • powerpoint import and .pdf export
  • audience response
  • remote control, including annotation

Find out more on the 2sli.de website.

Demonstration of features on 2sli.de

 

Improve your presentation skills

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📥  Event Review, Students' Union

Recently, a couple of Students' Union Student Trainers ran a fantastic session to a group of students on how to improve your presentation skills. This successful event is a repeat of one which ran in Semester 1, and can be watched back online. The group activities have been cut out of this recording, so you will benefit much more from attending Skills Training sessions in person.

Did you know that the Skills Training web page has online tutorials as well as an up to date list of skills training activities?

 

Audience response systems

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📥  Event Review

Dr Richard Joiner introduced the session, which is available to watch online, by giving the audience an example of an Audience Response System (ARS), otherwise known as an Audience Voting System (AVS) or Electronic Voting System (EVS), in this instance, OMBEA, by asking them to use any mobile device they had with them to participate in answering some sample questions. Participants were able to see what it was like to respond to a question in many different ways, and to see how the responses could be displayed in bar charts, word clouds, etc.

It was mentioned by Richard that he liked to add music behind the questions, helping students feel comfortable to discuss the topic amongst themselves.

Richard linked his motivation for using technology such as audience response systems to getting students to be more active in teaching sessions and how well they learn. Audience response systems encourage students to engage in class by providing short mental breaks within the lecture allowing them to maintain focus, as well as supporting them to apply their recently acquired knowledge together with instant feedback, even in larger classes, to help their learning.

Please read the following to learn about the introduction of an audience response system here in Bath, and their effectiveness more generally.

 

Different uses for ARSs mentioned

  1. Promote active learning - help students develop a deeper understanding
  2. Formative assessment - to gain a rough understanding of what the students know
  3. Summative assessment - can be challenging and has issues such as registering the clickers, ensuring no cheating, etc.
  4. Interactive (revision) sessions - to lead at the pace of the students
  5. Unit/programme feedback - provides instant feedback with a good chance of high turnout
  6. Data collection - from a large collection of students with a range of experiences

 

How to use the University's audience response system

You can book the University's audience response system for use in your teaching from the Audio Visual Unit, and receive training on using the system from the e-Learning team.

Image from http://opus.bath.ac.uk/12505/1/

 

Key questions during the session

Have you received any feedback from students?
Students are generally very positive to any form of voting system, but Richard has seen a slightly lower response rate when students use their own devices, possibly because they don’t want to run down their batteries.

Is Nick Kinnie’s project report (on use of ARS) available?
The project is still underway so the report is forthcoming